In addition to organizing its own programming, the Baker-Nord Center for the Humanities supports and promotes humanities programming available throughout the Case Western Reserve University and Greater Cleveland community.  Below is the listing of other upcoming humanities-related programming.

FEBRUARY


Wednesday, February 19
The Sinai Palimpsests Project: Recovering Erased Texts in the World’s Oldest Library
Michael Phelps
4:00 pm
Kelvin Smith Library
The Sinai Palimpsests Project used spectral imaging to recover erased texts from 6,800 pages of palimpsest manuscripts at St. Catherine’s Monastery on Mount Sinai. St. Catherine’s Monastery, protected by its remote location in Egypt’s Sinai desert, preserves one of the world’s oldest and greatest libraries. Among its treasures are hundreds of palimpsest manuscripts, the erased layers of which have never before been studied. The project recovered erased works in 11 languages that range in date from the 5th to 12th century. Alongside biblical, theological, and liturgical works, the recovered texts include 11 classical works, 8 of which are previously unattested. The project is the largest effort to date to use scientific imaging to recover obscured information from historical source materials, and was a collaboration of St. Catherine’s Monastery of the Sinai (Egypt), the Early Manuscripts Electronic Library, and the UCLA Library. The presentation will cover the imaging and image processing methods used by the project and survey its results and impacts.

MICHAEL PHELPS is Executive Director of the Early Manuscripts Electronic Library (EMEL). He directed the Sinai Palimpsests Project and currently directs the Sinai Library Digitization Project, a new collaboration with St. Catherine’s Monastery and UCLA to digitize the manuscripts holdings of the Holy Monastery. He has directed projects to apply spectral imaging to palimpsests and damaged manuscripts in the Austrian National Library, the Ambrosiana Library (Milan), Cambridge University Library, the Vatican Library, the Berlin State Library, the Bienecke Library of Yale University, and the Museum of the Bible.

This event is co-sponsored by The CWRU Department of Art History and Art and Kelvin Smith Library and is free and open to the public.

Friday, February 21
The Discarded Universe: On Inventive Execution, from Stage to Classroom
Crawford Young (Basel Conservatorium)
4:00 pm
Harkness Chapel, 11200 Bellflower Road, Cleveland, Ohio 44106
This event is sponsored by the CWRU Department of Music and is part of their Colloquia series which provides a weekly forum for presentation and discussion of recent research by distinguished visitors and by CWRU faculty and graduate students in musicology, historical performance practice, and music education. It is free and open to the public.

Friday, February 28
Kamala Harris Rap Genius? Tuning and Temperament in the 2020 US Presidential Election
Dana Gorzelany-Mostak (Georgia College)
4:00 pm
Harkness Chapel, 11200 Bellflower Road, Cleveland, Ohio 4410
This event is sponsored by the CWRU Center for Popular Music Studies and is part of the Department of Music Colloquia series which provides a weekly forum for presentation and discussion of recent research by distinguished visitors and by CWRU faculty and graduate students in musicology, historical performance practice, and music education. It is free and open to the public.

Friday, February 28
A Little Million Doors: Poetry, Art, and the Sciences of Body and Mind (An Interdisciplinary Discussion)
Chad Sweeney
3:15 pm
Guilford Parlor, 11112 Bellflower Road
This interdisciplinary panel will offer several distinct but still related perspectives on the intersections between suffering and the imagination. Dr. Chad Sweeney (California State University – San Bernardino) will discuss his latest poetry collection, Little Million Doors, which was written during an autistic breakdown following his father’s death. Dr. Eleanor Davidson (CWRU, Bioethics – School of Medicine) will discuss Narrative Medicine and the ways that “writing in the shadow of the text” can support clinical practice and a patient-centered approach to care. Dr. Gary Deimler (CWRU, Sociology) will discuss the social construction of illness and the role of narrative in the healing process. And Camila Ring, a doctoral student in English at CWRU, will discuss the ways in which poets, whether biblical or contemporary, have used suffering to expand the theological and poetic imagination.

Chad Sweeney is the author of six books of poetry: Little Million Doors (Nightboat Books, winner of Nightboat Prize, 2019), Parable of Hide and Seek, White Martini of the Apocalypse, Wolf’s Milk (bilingual Spanish/English), Arranging the Blaze and An Architecture, and two books of translation, The Art of Stepping Through Time, the selected poems of Iranian dissident poet H.E. Sayeh, and Pablo Neruda’s final book, Calling on the Destruction of Nixon and the Advancement of the Chilean Revolution (2019). Sweeney’s poems have been included in Best American Poetry, The Pushcart Prize Anthology and Verse Daily. He is the editor of the anthology, Days I Moved Through Ordinary Sounds: Teaching Artists of Writers Corps in Poetry and Prose, and Iroquois elder Maurice Kenny’s posthumous collection of poetry and prose: Monahsetah, Resistance, and Other Markings on Turtle’s Back. Chad Sweeney holds an MFA from San Francisco State University and a PhD from Western Michigan University. He is an Associate Professor of English/Creative Writing at California State University San Bernardino where he edits Ghost Town Literary Magazine.

This event is supported by the Baker-Nord Center for the Humanities, the English Department Colloquium Series, the Sharnoff Endowed Fund for Poetry, Writers House, and the Program in Medicine, Society, and Culture.  It is free and open to the public.

MARCH


Wednesday, March 3
Ratner Family Lecture:
White Utopias: The Religious Exoticism of Transformational Festivals
Amanda Lucia
4:30 pm
Tinkham Veale University Center Ballroom C
10038 Bellflower Road, Cleveland, Ohio . 44160
Amanda Lucia, PhD is Associate Professor of Religious Studies at the University of California, Riverside. Her forthcoming book, White Utopias: The Religious Exoticism of Transformational Festivals, investigates the intersections of race and religion among the “spiritual, but not religious.” Dr. Amanda Lucia is a historian of religions who has studied contemporary global circulations of Hindu religions, guru movements, gender, sexuality, and charismatic authority from an ethnographic and anthropo- logical approach. Her publications include Reflections of Amma: Devotees in a Global Embrace (2014) and articles in the Journal of the American Academy of Religion, History of Religions, the International Journal of Hindu Studies, the Journal of Hindu Studies, and CrossCurrents.

A reception will immediately follow the lecture.

This event is sponsored by the Department of Religious Studies and is free and open to the public.

Friday, March 6
Composing Americana: Stephen Foster and the Legacy of Blackface
Matthew Morrison (NYU)
4:00 pm
Harkness Chapel, 11200 Bellflower Road, Cleveland, Ohio. 44106
This event is sponsored by the CWRU Center for Popular Music Studies and is part of the Department of Music Colloquia series which provides a weekly forum for presentation and discussion of recent research by distinguished visitors and by CWRU faculty and graduate students in musicology, historical performance practice, and music education. It is free and open to the public.

 

Wednesday, March 18
The Keithley Lecture in Art History: Vuillard, Decoration and the Hidden Portraiture
Gloria Groom, Chair of European Painting and Sculpture and the David and Mary Winton Green Curator at The Art Institute of Chicago
5:30 PM, reception to follow
Cleveland Museum of Art Lecture hall
Edouard Vuillard (1868-1940) is best known for his small scale genre scenes of intimate, daily life.  This presentation will focus on his lesser known large-scale decorative paintings, paintings made on commission to serve as murals for specific domestic interiors.  Paradoxically, these are his most “intimist,” often featuring portraits of friends, family, and places, whose identity and meaning are decipherable only to those for whom they were created.

This event is co-sponsored by CWRU Department of Art History and Art and The Cleveland Museum of Art and is free and open to the public.

 

Friday, March 20
Towards a Theory and Practice of Public Musicology
Jason Hanley (Rock and Roll Hall of Fame)
4:00 pm
Harkness Chapel, 11200 Bellflower Road, Cleveland, Ohio. 44106
This event is sponsored by the CWRU Center for Popular Music Studies and is part of the Department of Music Colloquia series which provides a weekly forum for presentation and discussion of recent research by distinguished visitors and by CWRU faculty and graduate students in musicology, historical performance practice, and music education. It is free and open to the public.

Monday, March 23
Julius Lecture in Byzantine Art: Heaven on Earth: Justinian’s Hagia Sophia
Robert Ousterhout, Professor emeritus in history and art at the University of Pennsylvania
5:30pm
Foster-Castele Great Hall of The Alumni House
This talk addresses the transformation of the basilica as an architectural form and its subsequent impact on architecture in the eastern Mediterranean. Justinian’s Hagia Sophia represents a critical moment in architectural history in terms of form, meaning, and aesthetics.

This event is sponsored by the Department of Art History and Art and is free and open to the public.

Wednesday, March 25
The Annual Harvey Buchanan Lecture in Art History and the Humanities: Sara Tyson Hallowell: Pioneer Curator and Art Advisor in The Gilded Age
Carolyn Kinder Carr, PhD, Case Western Reserve University Alumna and Former Deputy Director and Chief Curator, National Portrait Gallery, Smithsonian Institution
5:30pm, reception to follow
The Cleveland Museum of Art Recital Hall
Carr describes the arc of Hallowell’s career, detailing her critically acclaimed exhibitions of contemporary art in Chicago in the 1880s; her crucial advice to Bertha Honoré Palmer, wife of wealthy hotel magnate Potter Palmer, which led to early and important collections of Impressionists paintings; her friendships with esteemed artists, among them Mary Cassatt and August Rodin; as well as the great disappointment of her life, her failure to become director of art at the 1893 World’s Columbian Exposition. Despite her impeccable credentials, the fact that she was a woman was “an insuperable objection.” 

This event is sponsored by the Department of Art History and Art and is free and open to the public.

Thursday, March 26
Rembrandt van Rijn, Bankrupt Printmaker:  Art, Love, and Insolvency in the 17th Century
The Honorable Scott A. Clarkson, Bankruptcy Judge of the Central District, California
5pm, reception to follow
Case Western Reserve University School of Law
This event is jointly sponsored by the Department of Art History and Art; The Spangenberg Center for Law, Technology and the Arts; and The Baker-Nord Center for the Humanities.

Friday, March 27
Assessment as Active Music Pedagogy
Kelly Parkes (Columbia University)
4:00 pm
This event is sponsored by the CWRU Department of Music and is part of their Colloquia series which provides a weekly forum for presentation and discussion of recent research by distinguished visitors and by CWRU faculty and graduate students in musicology, historical performance practice, and music education. It is free and open to the public.

APRIL


Friday, April 3:
The Race of Sound: The Acousmatic Question as Voice-Making
Nina Eidsheim (UCLA)
4:00 pm
This event is sponsored by the CWRU Department of Music and is part of their Colloquia series which provides a weekly forum for presentation and discussion of recent research by distinguished visitors and by CWRU faculty and graduate students in musicology, historical performance practice, and music education. It is free and open to the public.

Friday, April 17
U.S.-Mexico Border Chords & Discords: Perspectives on the Changing Sonic Ecologies in the American Southwest
Sabine Feisst (Arizona State)
4:00 pm
This event is sponsored by the CWRU Department of Music and is part of their Colloquia series which provides a weekly forum for presentation and discussion of recent research by distinguished visitors and by CWRU faculty and graduate students in musicology, historical performance practice, and music education. It is free and open to the public.

Friday, April 24
Music Education Students (CWRU): Lightning Talks
4:00 pm
This event is sponsored by the CWRU Department of Music and is part of their Colloquia series which provides a weekly forum for presentation and discussion of recent research by distinguished visitors and by CWRU faculty and graduate students in musicology, historical performance practice, and music education. It is free and open to the public.