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Upcoming Events

Event Date and Location Summary
Masks and Reality in Ancient Athenian Drama Thu. September 26th, 2019
4:00 pm-5:00 pm
at Clark Hall Room 206, 11130 Bellflower Road, Cleveland, OH 44106
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In her lecture Dr. Amy R. Cohen, Professor of Classics and Theater at Randolph College, will look at both historical and contemporary use of masks to stage ancient Greek tragedy and comedy. Professor Cohen has developed a specialty in staging Greek drama in outdoor theaters with masks that she and her students have made. While Professor Cohen’s original exploration of masks sought to identify and recreate authentic-practices in ancient mask making, in recent years she and her students have begun to explore ways in which modern technology, such as 3-D printing, might assist in making masks for staging ancient plays. 

Continue reading… Masks and Reality in Ancient Athenian Drama

2019 Rose Wohlgemuth Weisman Women’s Voices Lecture: A Conversation with Joy Harjo Tue. October 1st, 2019
5:00 pm-6:00 pm
at Tinkham Veale University Center Ballroom B, 10038 Bellflower Road, Cleveland, OH 44106
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Critically-acclaimed indigenous poet Joy Harjo discusses her work with poet Sarah Gridley, Associate Professor in the Department of English, and Advocate Susan Dominguez, SAGES Teaching Fellow.  Harjo, a member of the Mvskoke/Creek Nation, is the author of several books of poetry, as well as collections of interviews and conversations, children’s books, and collaborative art texts.  She is the 23rd U.S. poet laureate  and the first Native American poet to serve in that position. Among her many honors, Harjo has received the PEN USA Literary Award for Creative Non-Fiction, the American Book Award, and the Jackson Poetry Prize.  A renowned musician,

Continue reading… 2019 Rose Wohlgemuth Weisman Women’s Voices Lecture: A Conversation with Joy Harjo

Faculty Work-in-Progress: Hamlet’s Earworms Thu. October 3rd, 2019
4:30 pm-5:30 pm
at Clark Hall Room 206, 11130 Bellflower Road, Cleveland, OH 44106
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In her talk, Maggie Vinter, Associate Professor in the Department of English, explores earworms and other sonic echoes in Hamlet.  Outside the world of the play, earworms from Hamlet continue to replicate as the various quotes that maintain cultural significance detached from the plot. The behavior of these fragments inside and outside the play should encourage us to consider the importance of automatic memory and reflexive, involuntary bodily responses to creating and consuming literature.

Pre-lecture reception begins at 4:15 pm.

This event is free and open to the public.  Registration requested.

Continue reading… Faculty Work-in-Progress: Hamlet’s Earworms

The Secrets Between Us: A Conversation with Thrity Umrigar Mon. October 7th, 2019
5:00 pm-6:00 pm
at Tinkham Veale University Center Ballroom A, 10038 Bellflower Road, Cleveland, OH 44106
Add to Google Calendar

Thrity Umrigar, Professor in the CWRU Department of English, will talk about the inspiration for her new novel and the challenges of writing a sequel.  She is the best-selling author of the novels Bombay Time, The Space Between Us, If Today Be Sweet, The Weight of Heaven, The World We Found and The Story Hour. She is also the author of the memoir, First Darling of the Morning.  Her books have been translated into several languages and published in over fifteen countries. 

This event is free and open to the public.  Registration requested.

Continue reading… The Secrets Between Us: A Conversation with Thrity Umrigar

Graduate Work-in-Progress – Birthing Nature: Why One Childbirth Drug Was Natural and Another Was Not Tue. October 15th, 2019
12:00 pm-1:00 pm
at Clark Hall Room 206, 11130 Bellflower Road, Cleveland, OH 44106
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Some of the greatest obstetric innovations have been pharmaceutical pain relief methods and labor inducing drugs. However, the existing historical narrative focuses on technological and surgical interventions in childbirth. In her talk, Naomi Rendina, Phd candidate in the Department of History, shifts the focus from surgical and technological interventions in birth to pharmaceutical interventions and how drugs used to induce labor reshaped American childbirth.

An informal lunch will be served.

This event is free and open to the public.  Registration requested.

Continue reading… Graduate Work-in-Progress – Birthing Nature: Why One Childbirth Drug Was Natural and Another Was Not

Faculty Work-in-Progess – Bodies of the Nation: U.S. Disaster Identification in the Early Cold War Tue. October 29th, 2019
4:30 pm-5:30 pm
at Clark Hall Room 206, 11130 Bellflower Road, Cleveland, OH 44106
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The years following WWII witnessed a dramatic shift in disaster victim identification in the United States. What had once been a fragmented effort proscribed by local resources developed into an orderly and scientific system bolstered by national networks of specialists. In the 1940s, however, police, coroners, and physicians around the country were inspired by their firsthand experiences with mass-fatality events to find more efficient and objective means of identification and to develop new methods for reading the body. In her talk, Vicki Daniel, an Instructor in the Department of History, will discuss how these new systems of identification were shaped by the larger social and political context of the Cold War to transform disaster identification into a symbolic performance of the state’s ability to protect its citizens in times of political uncertainty and corporeal threat. 

Continue reading… Faculty Work-in-Progess – Bodies of the Nation: U.S. Disaster Identification in the Early Cold War

Faculty Work-in-Progress – Domestic Horrors in the Age of Revolution: Acid Throwing in Leonora Sansay’s Secret History; or, The Horrors of St. Domingo Tue. November 5th, 2019
4:30 pm-5:30 pm
at Clark Hall Room 206, 11130 Bellflower Road, Cleveland, OH 44106
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In recent years Europe and Asia have seen a surge in acid attacks that has increased public awareness of the highly gendered, racial, and political elements of this particularly gruesome crime. Acid attacks, or acid throwing, however, has a long history, though it is one that isn’t well documented. In this talk, Caitlin Kelly, Lecturer in SAGES and the Department of English, explores a reference to acid throwing in Leonora Sansay’s 1808 novel Secret History; or, the Horrors of St. Domingo that has thus far been overlooked by scholars. Following the trade routes from France to Philadelphia to the Caribbean,

Continue reading… Faculty Work-in-Progress – Domestic Horrors in the Age of Revolution: Acid Throwing in Leonora Sansay’s Secret History; or, The Horrors of St. Domingo

2019 Walter A. Strauss Lecture Series – The Author in the Text: A Brief History Mon. November 11th, 2019
5:00 pm-6:00 pm
at Wolstein Building Auditorium, 2103 Cornell Road, Cleveland, OH . 44106
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The Author in the Margins
Elisabeth Ladenson

The relation between the literary text and its author has been a subject of controversy for at least two hundred years, since Romanticism popularized the myth of the distracted genius producing great works from the depths of his psyche through a process mysterious even to him (almost always him rather than her).  Throughout the 19th century the “great men” paradigm generally prevailed, even as Nietzsche, for one, insisted that the author was simply “the maternal womb, the soil, or,

Continue reading… 2019 Walter A. Strauss Lecture Series – The Author in the Text: A Brief History

2019 Walter A. Strauss Lecture Series – Colette at the Gas Station: The Woman Author Wed. November 13th, 2019
5:00 pm-6:00 pm
at Wolstein Building Auditorium, 2103 Cornell Road, Cleveland, OH . 44106
Add to Google Calendar

The Author in the Margins
Elisabeth Ladenson

The relation between the literary text and its author has been a subject of controversy for at least two hundred years, since Romanticism popularized the myth of the distracted genius producing great works from the depths of his psyche through a process mysterious even to him (almost always him rather than her).  Throughout the 19th century the “great men” paradigm generally prevailed, even as Nietzsche, for one, insisted that the author was simply “the maternal womb, the soil, or, in some cases, the dung or manure” out of which the work grows.  

Continue reading… 2019 Walter A. Strauss Lecture Series – Colette at the Gas Station: The Woman Author

2019 Walter A. Strauss Lecture Series – Proust and the Marx Brothers Fri. November 15th, 2019
5:00 pm-6:00 pm
at Wolstein Building Auditorium, 2103 Cornell Road, Cleveland, OH . 44106
Add to Google Calendar

The Author in the Margins
Elisabeth Ladenson

The relation between the literary text and its author has been a subject of controversy for at least two hundred years, since Romanticism popularized the myth of the distracted genius producing great works from the depths of his psyche through a process mysterious even to him (almost always him rather than her).  Throughout the 19th century the “great men” paradigm generally prevailed, even as Nietzsche, for one, insisted that the author was simply “the maternal womb, the soil,

Continue reading… 2019 Walter A. Strauss Lecture Series – Proust and the Marx Brothers

Graduate Work-in-Progress – A Natural Improvement: Wetlands and Commodification in Nineteenth Century America Thu. November 21st, 2019
4:30 pm-5:30 pm
at Clark Hall Room 206, 11130 Bellflower Road, Cleveland, OH 44106
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Wetlands are often virtually invisible in the historical record right up to the moment that thoughts turn to drainage. They typically appear–swampy, dark, malarial–only when they inhibit movement, pose a threat to human health, or present an obstacle to agriculture. This has created a sense of a fundamental antagonism between humans and wetlands, and of inevitability around attempts to drain them, but this is quite misleading. In this talk, Davis Allen, a PhD candidate in the Department of History, explores the long history of the commodification of American wetlands, and explains how our relationship with wetlands has been shaped by a particular view of natural resources and private property.

Continue reading… Graduate Work-in-Progress – A Natural Improvement: Wetlands and Commodification in Nineteenth Century America

Past Events

Event Date Summary
Economies of Mind: Attention/Distraction/Absorption Mon. April 15th, 2019
12:00 pm-1:00 pm

What does it mean to listen, read, or look with attention? What roots can we trace for the modern “crisis of distraction”? And how are theories of focus (and its deficit) tied to wider ideas around creativity, productivity, ethics, and aesthetics? These are some of the questions explored in this mini-symposium, featuring a series of short talks by cognitive scientists, literary critics, neurologists and musicologists.

An informal lunch will be served.

This event is free and open to the public.  Registration requested.

Continue reading… Economies of Mind: Attention/Distraction/Absorption

That Complex Whole: Making Sense of Music Mon. April 15th, 2019
4:00 pm-5:00 pm

Music reflects a multitude of different kinds of influences. These influences include acoustical, biological, sensory, cognitive, attentional, idiomatic, historical, economic, technological, formal, social, cultural, and other factors. This presentation describes a dozen contrasting studies that provide complementary insights into musical organization and behavior.  Huron suggests that no single approach holds the “key” to understanding music, and that music scholarship needs to be even more interdisciplinary and multifaceted than is currently supposed.

Free and open to the public.  Registration requested.

About the Speaker:

David Huron is Arts and Humanities Distinguished Professor in the School of Music at the Ohio State University and is also affiliated with the OSU Center for Cognitive and Brain Sciences.

Continue reading… That Complex Whole: Making Sense of Music

Faculty Work-in-Progress – Daniel Guérin, On-the-Ground Reporter in Nazi Germany Tue. April 9th, 2019
4:30 pm-5:30 pm

French writer and activist Daniel Guérin was one of many French journalists to travel to Germany in the early 1930s in order to report on the rise of Nazism. His first-person accounts of the months surrounding Hitler’s accession to power, published first in the press and later in book form as The Brown Plague, remain unique in their genre, however. Commissioned in part by French newspaper editor and rising statesman Léon Blum, Guérin rode his bicycle through a Germany in social and political upheaval, making contact with both German resistants and Nazi Party adherents. In this work-in-progress, Christine Cano,

Continue reading… Faculty Work-in-Progress – Daniel Guérin, On-the-Ground Reporter in Nazi Germany

Crooked River Conversation: Cleveland Author Kristin Ohlson Tue. April 2nd, 2019
5:00 pm-7:30 pm

This event is part of the 2019 Cleveland Humanities Festival: Nature.

Celebrate 50 years of Cuyahoga River rebirth! Author of the acclaimed The Soil Will Save Us, Kristin combines culinary and science in a tale of farmers and foodies who heal our soil and save our water. Includes riveting short films about family farmers, vintners and ranchers as part of Carbon Nation, the award-winning series by director and University of Arizona professor Peter Byck.

Following Kristin’s talk, there will be a panel discussion moderated by Peter Bode from the West Creek Conservancy. 

Continue reading… Crooked River Conversation: Cleveland Author Kristin Ohlson

Drawn to Yellowstone: The Role of Art in the Preservation of the American Landscape Wed. March 27th, 2019
5:00 pm-6:00 pm

This event is part of the 2019 Cleveland Humanities Festival: Nature.

Throughout history, art has served as an agent of change. In the 19th and 20th centuries, several artists played significant roles in efforts to preserve the wildness of the American landscape as it was being lost rapidly. The emerging conservation movement of the late 1900’s was strongly influenced by the inspiration and agency of artists such as Albert Bierstadt, Thomas Cole, and Frederic Edwin Church. Specifically, the story of the creation of Yellowstone, the world’s first national park, is inextricably rooted in the lives and works of several artists –

Continue reading… Drawn to Yellowstone: The Role of Art in the Preservation of the American Landscape

Buddhism and the Natural World: Discerning an Environmental Imperative Mon. March 25th, 2019
5:00 pm-6:00 pm

 

This event is part of the 2019 Cleveland Humanities Festival: Nature.

In his talk, Mark Blum, Professor and Shinjo Ito Distinguished Chair in Japanese Studies at the University of California, Berkeley, will first look at traditional views of the natural world in Indian, Chinese, and Japanese Buddhism, where nonhuman sentient life forms commonly appear as a legitimate voice in the unfolding of truth and the neutral view of nonsentient life and inorganic matter in India takes on greater spiritual significance as one moves eastward in Asia. Then the issue of ecology and environmental ethics will be considered in an attempt to clarify the efforts being made to infer an environmental imperative on the basis of Buddhist values.

Continue reading… Buddhism and the Natural World: Discerning an Environmental Imperative

Is Climate Change the End? And if so, the End of What? Fri. March 22nd, 2019
5:00 pm-6:00 pm

This event is part of the 2019 Cleveland Humanities Festival: Nature.

Years ago, Bill McKibben suggested that climate change would be the end of nature. More recently, Elizabeth Kolbert has argued that the Sixth Extinction means the end of nature as we know it. Yet other scholars have argued that the term “nature” is not helpful—humans have always been modifying the world in which we live. And in The Collapse of Western Civilization, Erik Conway and Naomi Oreskes argue that liberal democracy is at stake as well. In her talk, Naomi Oreskes, Professor of the History of Science at Harvard University,

Continue reading… Is Climate Change the End? And if so, the End of What?

Panel Discussion: Changing the Politics of Earth Thu. March 21st, 2019
6:00 pm-7:00 pm

This event is part of the 2019 Cleveland Humanities Festival: NATURE

Planetary-scaled environmental issues are the frame for environmentalism today.  They imply that we change how we think about politics.  From re-examining extractive fossil fuels, to questioning the economy of animal products, to re-organizing governance of Earth and modifying some of our central moral, spiritual, and political concepts, the politics of Earth is the context for thinking about nature today. 

Moderated by Jeremy Bendik-Keymer, Elmer G. Beamer-Hubert H. Schneider Professor in Ethics, panelists from the environmental humanities will discuss their work and take questions from the audience.

Continue reading… Panel Discussion: Changing the Politics of Earth

Faculty Work-in-Progress – American Muslim Students during the Cold War Tue. March 5th, 2019
12:00 pm-1:00 pm

Through the 1970s, the Muslim Students’Association (MSA) was the only Muslim organization in the United States that boasted a national reach, with campus chapters in every geographic region. Embracing a revivalist and activist program, MSA members created Muslim spaces on campus, as well as mosques, schools, financial trusts, and non-profit organizations off-campus in order to reinvigorate religious practice among American Muslims and to improve the public image of Islam. In this lecture, Justine Howe, Assistant Professor of Religious Studies, explores how the MSA shaped U.S. religious politics as its members navigated the challenges and opportunities of Cold War America.

Continue reading… Faculty Work-in-Progress – American Muslim Students during the Cold War

Graduate Student Work-in-Progress – La Méthode graphique: Musical Anatomies and Scientistic Ruptures in Stepanov Dance Notation Thu. February 21st, 2019
12:00 pm-1:00 pm

How can a performing art form be recorded on paper? In this presentation, Musicology PhD candidate Sophie Benn examines one possible answer to this question, found in a treatise on dance notation from the brink of twentieth-century modernism, Vladimir Ivanovich Stepanov’s Alphabet des mouvements du corps humain (1892). Stepanov suggests that the solution may lay in the latest developments of science, including a turn towards graphical representation championed by Étienne-Jules Marey, experimental psychology’s burgeoning interest in kinesthesia, and problems raised by Jean-Martin Charcot concerning research in neurological pathology.

An informal lunch will be served.

This event is free and open to the public. 

Continue reading… Graduate Student Work-in-Progress – La Méthode graphique: Musical Anatomies and Scientistic Ruptures in Stepanov Dance Notation

2019 Baker-Nord Distinguished Faculty Lecture – Brooding Over the Face of the Deep: Language, Otherness, and Technologies of Translation Wed. February 6th, 2019
4:30 pm-5:30 pm

New and emerging media technologies are transforming our understandings and practices of translation. We are more aware than ever of the impossibility of separating message from medium. For biblical translators, this means and that our subject of research is not the Bible in media but Bible as media. What possibilities are emerging for altering translation in ways that not only make us more aware of the ambiguities inherent in any process of translation but also of the irreducibility of the text in translation as a kind of face of the other? How might new technologies and interfaces provide users access to the indeterminate processes of translation?

Continue reading… 2019 Baker-Nord Distinguished Faculty Lecture – Brooding Over the Face of the Deep: Language, Otherness, and Technologies of Translation

Faculty Work-in-Progress – The Secrets Between Us: A Conversation with Thrity Umrigar Wed. January 30th, 2019
5:00 pm-6:00 pm

DO TO DANGEROUSLY LOW TEMPERATURES, THIS EVENT HAS BEEN CANCELLED.  IT WILL BE RESCHEDULED FOR THE FALL 2019 SEMESTER.

Thrity Umrigar, Professor in the CWRU Department of English, will talk about the inspiration for her new novel and the challenges of writing a sequel.  

Umrigar is the best-selling author of the novels Bombay TimeThe Space Between Us,If Today Be SweetThe Weight of HeavenThe World We Found and The Story Hour. She is also the author of the memoir, 

Continue reading… Faculty Work-in-Progress – The Secrets Between Us: A Conversation with Thrity Umrigar

An Iliad Sun. January 27th, 2019
2:30 pm-6:00 pm

One actor. One musician. The Trojan War. With vivid storytelling and live cello, two women transform a bare stage into a raging battlefield where gods, heroes, and empires clash in a quest for vengeance and glory. Cleveland Play House presents this searing adaptation of Homer’s timeless epic catapults an ancient tale of fate and fury into the present day.   Use code CLASSICS to purchase discounted tickets.

Following the performance, join the conversation lead by Professor Paul Iversen, Chair of the CWRU Department of Classics. The conversation will focus on the literature, history, and other dimensions of the cultures of ancient Greece and Rome and why An Iliad has withstood the test of time.

Continue reading… An Iliad

An Evening with Claudia Rankine Wed. January 23rd, 2019
7:00 pm-8:30 pm

Poet Claudia Rankine will visit to discuss her powerful, award-winning book Citizen: An American Lyric.

Claudia Rankine is the author of Citizen: An American Lyric and four previous books, including Don’t Let Me Be Lonely: An American Lyric. A provocative meditation on race, Citizen recounts mounting racial aggressions in ongoing encounters in twenty-first-century daily life and in the media. The book was a finalist for the 2014 National Book Award in Poetry and the National Book Critics Circle Award in Criticism and has won the National Book Critics Circle Award in Poetry,

Continue reading… An Evening with Claudia Rankine

Faculty-Work-in-Progress – Kafka’s Monkey and Other Phantoms of Africa Wed. November 28th, 2018
4:30 pm-5:30 pm

Continue reading… Faculty-Work-in-Progress – Kafka’s Monkey and Other Phantoms of Africa

Faculty-Work-in-Progress – Tears of Compassion in Classical Athens    Tue. November 13th, 2018
4:30 pm-5:30 pm

Continue reading… Faculty-Work-in-Progress – Tears of Compassion in Classical Athens   

2018 Richard N. Campen Lecture in Architecture and Sculpture – Material Performance and Ecological Priorities Mon. November 5th, 2018
4:30 pm-5:30 pm

Please note new venue.

As society contends with rising concerns over the viability of our ecosystems, the convergence of human and ecological priorities is increasingly evident. Architecture bears a long history of prioritizing the needs and desires of human experience, including the provision of shelter, creation of community, and design of conditions for physical comfort and human health. Over the past several decades, architecture has responded to challenges of sustainability, seeking to minimize the overall environmental impact of buildings and establish new metrics of energy performance. These measures increasingly acknowledge the impact of buildings on the biosphere.

Continue reading… 2018 Richard N. Campen Lecture in Architecture and Sculpture – Material Performance and Ecological Priorities

Faculty-Work-in-Progress – Why Black not Blue? Revising & Reimagining Children’s Picture Books in the Age of the #WeNeedDiverseBooks Movement Tue. October 30th, 2018
4:30 pm-5:30 pm

PLEASE NOTE CHANGE OF VENUE.

Is the cat in Dr. Seuss’s The Cat in the Hat Black? Is presenting images of enslaved people smiling ever appropriate in children’s literature? What is the impact of personifying a bad mood in blackface in a picture book? In this presentation, Cara Byrne, a Lecturer in the Department of English and the Research Advisor on Diverse Children’s Literature for the Schubert Center for Child Studies, will explore recent controversies surrounding picture books for young readers, including The Bad Mood and the Stick, A Birthday Cake for George Washington,

Continue reading… Faculty-Work-in-Progress – Why Black not Blue? Revising & Reimagining Children’s Picture Books in the Age of the #WeNeedDiverseBooks Movement

2018 Issa Lecture – The Quest for Environmental and Climate Justice: Why Race and Place Still Matter Tue. October 16th, 2018
4:30 pm-5:30 pm

Climate change is the defining global environmental justice, human rights and public health issue of the twenty-first century. The most vulnerable populations will suffer the earliest and most damaging setbacks because of where they live, their limited income and economic means, and their lack of access to health care.  Climate-sensitive hazards are forecast to increase in the coming years. However, not all of the populations residing within these hazard zones have the same capacity to prepare for, respond to, cope with, and rebound from disaster events. Professor Robert D. Bullard’s presentation will focus primarily on the need for empowering vulnerable populations,

Continue reading… 2018 Issa Lecture – The Quest for Environmental and Climate Justice: Why Race and Place Still Matter

Faculty-Work-in-Progress – Ex nihilo / In nihilum: Contending with Medieval Void Wed. October 3rd, 2018
12:00 pm-1:00 pm

Nature, medieval philosophers exclaimed in an unsteady chorus, abhors a vacuum. Medieval art, exclaims a much more assured collective scholarly voice, equally abhors the same: hence, the notion of horror vacui, the fear of empty space, is often construed as a definitive feature of Gothic material culture in its many manifestations. In her lecture, Elina Gertsman, Professor in the Department of Art History and Art, explores complex conversations among philosophy, physics, mathematics, piety, and image-making in order to suggest that late medieval art, in its constant attempts to grapple with the unrepresentability of the invisible,

Continue reading… Faculty-Work-in-Progress – Ex nihilo / In nihilum: Contending with Medieval Void

2018 Keithley Symposium – Life an Object: The Thinker as Prism Fri. September 28th, 2018
9:00 am-4:30 pm

Inspired by Rodin’s The Thinker, the Keithley Symposium offers an exploration of the birth, lives and afterlives of objects. The event honors the sculpture’s centennial and remarks upon its layered history, and includes interdisciplinary conversations about how we interpret impermanence and what it means to our communities through works of art. The daylong symposium will consist of three panels of scholars, artists, conservators, and curators, and a series of concurrent gallery workshops.

 

 

Panel I – Birth of an Object
Per Knutas, The Eric and Jane Nord Chief Conservator,

Continue reading… 2018 Keithley Symposium – Life an Object: The Thinker as Prism

2018 Keithley Symposium – Life an An Object: The Thinker as Prism – Keynote Address: Troubling Thoughts Thu. September 27th, 2018
5:00 pm-6:00 pm

Contemporary American sculptor and installation artist Jim Hodges will present the keynote address for the inaugural Keithley Symposium.  In his address, he will reflect on his experiences of The Thinker at the CMA. Since he first encountered it at the CMA’s south entrance in 2012, this work has raised questions for Hodges about art’s power in relation to its original function. Now 6 years later, Hodges’s own sculpture, Untitled (bridge of harmony) sits on the north lawn in the CMA’s Donna and Stewart Kohl Sculpture Garden, where it was installed in 2014.

Continue reading… 2018 Keithley Symposium – Life an An Object: The Thinker as Prism – Keynote Address: Troubling Thoughts

A Conversation with A. Van Jordan Wed. September 26th, 2018
5:00 pm-6:00 pm

Poet and previous Anisfield-Wolf Book Award winner A. Van Jordan will be in conversation with Dave Lucas, Ohio’s Poet Laureate and an instructor in the CWRU Department of English. Born in Akron, Ohio, A. Van Jordan received his Masters of Fine Arts from the MFA Program for Writers at Warren Wilson College. He is also a graduate of the Cave Canem Workshop. His first book, Rise, won the PEN Oakland/Josephine Miles Award and was a selection of the Academy of American Poets book club. He has received a Whiting Writers Award, the Gilbert-Chappelle Distinguished Poet Award,

Continue reading… A Conversation with A. Van Jordan

2018 Walter A. Strauss Lecture Series – The Self Divided: The Partition of 1947 Fri. September 21st, 2018
5:00 pm-6:00 pm

In this series of lectures, Priya Satia, Professor of Modern English History at Stanford University, will examine how people with conscience have committed unconscionable acts in the modern period. In some ways, the “modernity” of the modern period lies precisely in the growing awareness of conscience as an ethical rather than religious quality–a new self-consciousness about conscience. This understanding of conscience was tied to the modern historical sensibility; it depended on a sense of how much agency, and thus responsibility, humans have in shaping their world and their lives. Professor Satia will examine this phenomenon in three lectures covering key moments in the history of the British empire: the question of a Quaker gun-maker’s conscience in the period of the industrial revolution;

Continue reading… 2018 Walter A. Strauss Lecture Series – The Self Divided: The Partition of 1947

2018 Walter A. Strauss Lecture Series – The Defense of Inhumanity: Interwar Air Control and the British Idea of Arabia Wed. September 19th, 2018
5:00 pm-6:00 pm

In this series of lectures, Priya Satia, Professor of Modern English History at Stanford University, will examine how people with conscience have committed unconscionable acts in the modern period. In some ways, the “modernity” of the modern period lies precisely in the growing awareness of conscience as an ethical rather than religious quality–a new self-consciousness about conscience. This understanding of conscience was tied to the modern historical sensibility; it depended on a sense of how much agency, and thus responsibility, humans have in shaping their world and their lives. Professor Satia will examine this phenomenon in three lectures covering key moments in the history of the British empire: the question of a Quaker gun-maker’s conscience in the period of the industrial revolution;

Continue reading… 2018 Walter A. Strauss Lecture Series – The Defense of Inhumanity: Interwar Air Control and the British Idea of Arabia

2018 Walter A. Strauss Lecture Series – Pacifists Making Guns: The Galton Family and Britain’s Industrial Revolution Mon. September 17th, 2018
5:00 pm-6:00 pm

In this series of lectures, Priya Satia, Professor of Modern English History at Stanford University, will examine how people with conscience have committed unconscionable acts in the modern period. In some ways, the “modernity” of the modern period lies precisely in the growing awareness of conscience as an ethical rather than religious quality–a new self-consciousness about conscience. This understanding of conscience was tied to the modern historical sensibility; it depended on a sense of how much agency, and thus responsibility, humans have in shaping their world and their lives. Professor Satia will examine this phenomenon in three lectures covering key moments in the history of the British empire: the question of a Quaker gun-maker’s conscience in the period of the industrial revolution;

Continue reading… 2018 Walter A. Strauss Lecture Series – Pacifists Making Guns: The Galton Family and Britain’s Industrial Revolution

2018 Joseph and Violet Magyar Lecture in Hungarian Studies – A Specter Haunting Europe: The Myth of Judeo-Bolshevism in Hungary and Eastern Europe Tue. April 24th, 2018
5:00 pm-6:00 pm

For much of the twentieth century, Europe was haunted by a threat of its own imagining: Judeo-Bolshevism. This myth—that Communism was a Jewish plot to destroy the nations of Europe—was a paranoid fantasy. And yet fears of a Jewish Bolshevik conspiracy took hold during the Russian Revolution and spread across Europe. In this talk, Professor Hanebrink, Associate Professor of History at Rutgers, asks why the myth of Judeo-Bolshevism endured for so long in Hungary and Eastern Europe and what legacy this idea has left for contemporary politics in the region.

Registration recommended. 

 

Continue reading… 2018 Joseph and Violet Magyar Lecture in Hungarian Studies – A Specter Haunting Europe: The Myth of Judeo-Bolshevism in Hungary and Eastern Europe

Graduate Student Work-in-Progress – Rereading the Technomasculine Narrative: Performing Identity Through Video Games in Underground Hip Hop Thu. April 19th, 2018
4:30 pm-5:30 pm

Video games are ubiquitous in American culture today, and their sounds have worked their way into the popular soundscape over the past half-century. In this lecture, Musicology PhD Candidate Kate Rogers examines how current underground hip hop musicians use game sounds and topics as platforms for exploring identity, questioning stereotypes of race and gender, and advocating for social justice.

Pre-lecture reception begins at 4:15 pm.

Registration recommended.  

Continue reading… Graduate Student Work-in-Progress – Rereading the Technomasculine Narrative: Performing Identity Through Video Games in Underground Hip Hop

Film Screening and Discussion – They Shall Not Perish: The Story of Near East Relief Fri. April 13th, 2018
6:30 pm-8:30 pm

2018 CLEVELAND HUMANITIES FESTIVAL: HEALTH

This documentary details the unprecedented humanitarian efforts of thousands of Americans who saved a generation of orphans and refugees during the collapse of the Ottoman Empire and in the aftermath of the crisis that came to be known as the Armenian Genocide. The screening will be followed by a panel discussion led by Kenneth Ledford, Associate Professor in the Department of History and will include the film’s Executive Producer, Shant Mardirossian.

This event is co-sponsored by the Armenian Cultural Organization and the Near East Foundation.    

Registration recommended.  

Continue reading… Film Screening and Discussion – They Shall Not Perish: The Story of Near East Relief

Honoring the Story of Care Mon. April 2nd, 2018
4:30 pm-5:30 pm

2018 CLEVELAND HUMANITIES FESTIVAL: HEALTH

In his talk, Craig Irvine, Ph.D., Director of the Master’s Program in Narrative Medicine and founder and Academic Director of the Program in Narrative Medicine at Columbia University, proposes that the care of the sick unfolds in stories. The effective practice of healthcare requires the ability to recognize, absorb, interpret, and act on the stories and plights of others. Narrative Medicine addresses the need of patients and caregivers to voice their experience, to be heard and to be valued, and it acknowledges the power of narrative to change the way care is given and received.

Continue reading… Honoring the Story of Care

Quacks, Charlatans, and Geniuses: Medicine in Ancient Greece Tue. March 27th, 2018
12:00 pm-1:00 pm

2018 CLEVELAND HUMANITIES FESTIVAL: HEALTH

The Greeks laid the foundation for Western medicine, but much of what we know about their medical practices seems rather unpromising. Did eating a boiled mouse cure infant teething? Why should a doctor consult a patient’s horoscope? What did a surgery competition entail? Why was dissection forbidden? James C. McKeown, Professor of Classics at the University of Wisconsin – Madison and author of A Cabinet of Ancient Medical Curiosities: Strange Tales and Surprising Facts From the Healing Arts of Greece and Rome (2017), introduces us to some of the more curious realities of what happened when Socrates needed a doctor.

Continue reading… Quacks, Charlatans, and Geniuses: Medicine in Ancient Greece

Therapeutic Process Using Narrative: A Vulnerable Reading of Shakespeare’s “The Tempest” Mon. March 26th, 2018
4:30 pm-5:30 pm

2018 CLEVELAND HUMANITIES FESTIVAL: HEALTH

Life’s problems are often best approached in companionship with a story that offers guidance, and what guidance that is can vary considerably. The Hamlet in the Hospital project involves small groups performing readers’ theatre and then talking about how the play might be a companion in their work and lives. In this talk, Arthur Frank, Professor Emeritus of Sociology at the University of Calgary, Professor at VID Specialized University, Bergen, Norway, and core faculty at the Center for Narrative Practice in Boston, will discuss how in these discussions,

Continue reading… Therapeutic Process Using Narrative: A Vulnerable Reading of Shakespeare’s “The Tempest”

Symposium – Beyond Empathy: Critical Perspectives on Medicine, Society and Culture Sat. March 24th, 2018
8:30 am-4:00 pm

2018 CLEVELAND HUMANITIES FESTIVAL: HEALTH

This day-long symposium will feature presentations on the vibrant field of medical humanities, addressing a variety of unsettled questions, such as: How can humanistic and social science disciplines take account of one another’s insights for the study of health and medicine? How should these fields best inform clinical practice? And what, ultimately, is medical humanities for? Participants will include faculty and students from the humanities and social sciences, the School of Medicine, and the Cleveland Clinic. The program will include a demonstration in the Cleveland Museum of Art on the critical study of visual arts to train medical students in the skill of clinical observation.

Continue reading… Symposium – Beyond Empathy: Critical Perspectives on Medicine, Society and Culture

Food Politics in 2018: A Humanities Perspective Fri. March 23rd, 2018
4:30 pm-5:30 pm

2018 CLEVELAND HUMANITIES FESTIVAL : HEALTH

In this lecture Marion Nestle, Paulette Goddard Professor, of Nutrition, Food Studies, and Public Health, Emerita, at New York University, discusses the idea that the paradox of today’s globalized food system is that food insecurity or obesity threaten the health and welfare of half the world’s population.  Underlying these problems is an overabundant but inequitably distributed food system in which corporations are forced to expand markets to meet growth targets.   The contradiction between business and public health goals has led to a large and growing movement to promote more healthful,

Continue reading… Food Politics in 2018: A Humanities Perspective

No Más Bebés: Film and Conversation with Producer/Researcher Virginia Espino Wed. March 21st, 2018
6:00 pm-8:00 pm

2018 CLEVELAND HUMANITIES FESTIVAL: HEALTH

They came to have their babies. They went home sterilized. So begins the incredibly moving tales of the women chronicled in No Más Bebés(No More Babies), a heartbreaking documentary film based on the research of Latinx historian Virginia Espino. This is the story of Mexican immigrant mothers who sued Los Angeles county doctors, the state and the federal government after they were sterilized while giving birth in the 1970s. Led by an intrepid young Chicana lawyer, the mothers faced public exposure and stood up to powerful institutions in the name of justice.

Continue reading… No Más Bebés: Film and Conversation with Producer/Researcher Virginia Espino

Grant Writing for Humanities Majors Mon. March 19th, 2018
12:00 pm-1:30 pm

This workshop is part of a series designed to offer Humanities majors the opportunity to improve their professional writing skills. This session will focus on the grant writing skills needed when applying for fellowships, funding and awards.   It will include a presentation and workshop time to review and/or work on documents. Whether you’re starting from scratch or have existing materials, this series aims to give you tools that will enhance the written documents needed for pursing your career. 

This event is co-sponsored by the Career Center and the Writing Resource Center.

Lunch will be provided.

Continue reading… Grant Writing for Humanities Majors

Faculty-Work-in-Progress – Designing Power: The Women of The Fashion Group and the Promotion of Feminist Style During the 1930s and 1940s Tue. March 6th, 2018
4:30 pm-5:30 pm

During the interwar period, the fashion industry offered women more possibilities to gain positions of power and influence within the business. In 1930, The Fashion Group—an all-female organization of prominent women in the fashion business—was founded as a forum to promote the American fashion industry and women’s role in it. In its activities and publications, the Fashion Group managed to popularize ideas about women’s freedom and contributed to the mainstreaming of feminism in the popular media through the rise of the “American Style” that imagined the modern fashion consumer as economic independent, physically mobile woman seeking both style and comfort. 

Continue reading… Faculty-Work-in-Progress – Designing Power: The Women of The Fashion Group and the Promotion of Feminist Style During the 1930s and 1940s

Undergraduate Student Event – Humanities@Work: Non-Profits Mon. February 26th, 2018
6:00 pm-7:00 pm

At this event for undergraduate students, panelists working in the non-profit sector will discuss how studying the humanities influenced their careers and answer questions from the audience. Panelists include:

Alexis Crosby, Career Pathways Coordinator, Open Doors Academy;
Annette Iwamoto, the Strategic Initiatives Manager at Providence House;
Beth Thompson, the Program Director at Milestones Autism Resources; and
Melinda Jackson, Founder and Executive Director of the International Youth Leadership Foundation.

This event is co-sponosred by the Center for Civic Engagement and Learning (CCEL).

Dinner will be provided.  Registration requested.    

Continue reading… Undergraduate Student Event – Humanities@Work: Non-Profits

Graduate Student Work-in-Progress – Thinking Like a Virus: Rhetoric, Aesthetics, and AIDS Literature Thu. February 22nd, 2018
4:30 pm-5:30 pm

What does it mean to call a text “AIDS Literature”? What is the effect of applying this label to a text that does not attempt a faithful representation of the AIDS Crisis of the 1980s and 1990s, but instead deploys HIV and AIDS as literary metaphors? By analyzing texts such as the later experiments of William S. Burroughs, the novels of Kathy Acker, and the artwork and memoirs of David Wojnarowicz, English PhD Candidate Michael Chiappini seeks to trouble the prevailing understanding of AIDS literature by refocusing our attention to texts that do not aspire to narrative fidelity to the Crisis,

Continue reading… Graduate Student Work-in-Progress – Thinking Like a Virus: Rhetoric, Aesthetics, and AIDS Literature

Job Correspondence Writing for Humanities Majors Mon. February 19th, 2018
9:00 am-10:30 am

This workshop is part of a series designed to offer Humanities majors the opportunity to improve their professional writing skills. This session will focus on writing job correspondence including cover letters and thank you notes. It will include a presentation and workshop time to review and/or work on documents. Whether you’re starting from scratch or have existing materials, this series aims to give you tools that will enhance the written documents needed for pursing your career. 

This event is co-sponsored by the Career Center and the Writing Resource Center.

Registration requested.

Continue reading… Job Correspondence Writing for Humanities Majors

2018 Baker-Nord Distinguished Faculty Lecture – Thomas Hart Benton, Jackson Pollock, and the Secrets of El Greco Wed. February 7th, 2018
4:30 pm-5:30 pm

Click HERE to view this event.

Many of those who have been skeptical about Jackson Pollock’s work have done a double-take when they’ve encountered Pollock’s early drawings after El Greco, which employ an analytical approach he learned from his first and only teacher, Thomas Hart Benton.  They reveal that Pollock’s mature work was based on a deep understanding of the compositional methods of the old masters.  Interestingly, they also shed light on El Greco’s own working methods, and on the factors that led to the invention of El Greco’s signature artistic style. 

This lecture is presented by Henry Adams,

Continue reading… 2018 Baker-Nord Distinguished Faculty Lecture – Thomas Hart Benton, Jackson Pollock, and the Secrets of El Greco

Faculty-Work-in-Progress – Sacred Protests: Politics and Faith after Sexual Abuse Thu. February 1st, 2018
4:30 pm-5:30 pm

In the wake of Boston, 2002, survivors of Catholic clergy sexual abuse have been empowered to come forward with their stories of suffering. Yet from the ashes of their collective trauma, abuse survivors have built a robust agenda of political and religious reforms. In this lecture, Brian Clites, Instructor in the Department of Religious Studies, takes us on an ethnographic exploration of Catholic abuse survivors’ protests, examining not only the reforms that victims seek but also the conflicting emotions that they feel towards their church. Even as some survivors continue to kiss their Cardinal’s rings, others harbor fantasies of murder and revenge.

Continue reading… Faculty-Work-in-Progress – Sacred Protests: Politics and Faith after Sexual Abuse

Resume Writing for Humanities Majors Mon. January 29th, 2018
9:00 am-10:30 am

This workshop is part of a series designed to offer Humanities majors the opportunity to improve their professional writing skills. This session will focus on resume writing. It will include a presentation and workshop time to review and/or work on documents. Whether you’re starting from scratch or have existing materials, this series aims to give you tools that will enhance the written documents needed for pursing your career. 

This event is co-sponsored by the Career Center and the Writing Resource Center.

Registration requested.

Continue reading… Resume Writing for Humanities Majors

2017 Walter A. Strauss Lecture: The Importance of the Sciences – and the Arts Fri. December 1st, 2017
5:00 pm-6:00 pm

Celebrated philosopher Philip Kitcher of Columbia University is known for his studies of the role of scientific inquiry in democratic societies from the perspective the philosophy of pragmatism associated with William James and John Dewey.  In a series of three lectures on “Education and Democracy,” Kitcher broadens this inquiry to investigate the aims of education with emphasis on the importance of the humanities and the arts. This lecture series, in memory of Walter A. Strauss (1923-2008), who was the Elizabeth and William C. Treuhaft Professor of Humanities, is generously supported by funds provided by the Paul Wurzburger Endowment.

Continue reading… 2017 Walter A. Strauss Lecture: The Importance of the Sciences – and the Arts

2017 Walter A. Strauss Lecture Series: Shaping the Citizen Wed. November 29th, 2017
5:00 pm-6:00 pm

Celebrated philosopher Philip Kitcher of Columbia University is known for his studies of the role of scientific inquiry in democratic societies from the perspective the philosophy of pragmatism associated with William James and John Dewey.  In a series of three lectures on “Education and Democracy,” Kitcher broadens this inquiry to investigate the aims of education with emphasis on the importance of the humanities and the arts. This lecture series, in memory of Walter A. Strauss (1923-2008), who was the Elizabeth and William C. Treuhaft Professor of Humanities, is generously supported by funds provided by the Paul Wurzburger Endowment.

Continue reading… 2017 Walter A. Strauss Lecture Series: Shaping the Citizen

2017 Walter A. Strauss Lecture Series: Too Many Aims? Mon. November 27th, 2017
5:00 pm-6:00 pm

Celebrated philosopher Philip Kitcher of Columbia University is known for his studies of the role of scientific inquiry in democratic societies from the perspective the philosophy of pragmatism associated with William James and John Dewey.  In a series of three lectures on “Education and Democracy,” Kitcher broadens this inquiry to investigate the aims of education with emphasis on the importance of the humanities and the arts. This lecture series, in memory of Walter A. Strauss (1923-2008), who was the Elizabeth and William C. Treuhaft Professor of Humanities, is generously supported by funds provided by the Paul Wurzburger Endowment.

Continue reading… 2017 Walter A. Strauss Lecture Series: Too Many Aims?

Why Bob Dylan Matters Thu. November 16th, 2017
7:00 pm-8:00 pm

Click HERE to watch video of event.

Harvard Classics Professor, teacher since 2004 of the freshman seminar, “Bob Dylan”, and celebrated ‘Dylanologist’ Richard F. Thomas makes a compelling case for why the music and lyrics of Bob Dylan endure and inspire us.  Thomas discusses his new book Why Bob Dylan Matters with MacArthur Fellow and fellow Dylanologist Thomas Palaima and Professor Daniel Goldmark, Director of CWRU’s Center for Popular Music Studies. 

This event is co-sponsored by the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame Library and Archives and the CWRU Center for Popular Music Studies.

Continue reading… Why Bob Dylan Matters

The Arch of Titus: From Jerusalem to Rome and Back Tue. November 14th, 2017
6:00 pm-7:00 pm

The Department of Art History and Art, College of Arts and Sciences, CWRU, is pleased to present a lecture by Professor Steven Fine. In conjunction with his new exhibition at Yeshiva University Museum, Dr. Fine will talk to us about the Arch of Titus and Jewish history in the Roman period. “Stretching from the Roman era to the present, The Arch of Titus – from Jerusalem to Rome, and Back” explores the image and symbolism of the Arch from various vantage points – from emperors and popes to Jews and Christians, who re-interpreted the meaning of the Arch in modern times.

Continue reading… The Arch of Titus: From Jerusalem to Rome and Back

Humanities@Work: Medicine Mon. November 13th, 2017
6:00 pm-7:00 pm

Panelists discuss how studying the humanities influenced their careers. Panelists include:

Susan Wentz (Michigan ’75) majored in English. She attended a fine arts high school where she studied theater and was a member of two theater company companies during her college years. Her work is in medical education at the Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine, where she directs the Area Health Education Center.

Joseph Borus (Michigan ’90) majored in English and History. He is a pediatrician at Green Road Pediatrics and Clinical Instructor in the Department of Pediatrics,

Continue reading… Humanities@Work: Medicine

Faculty Work-in-Progress – Object Memory: Souvenirs and Memorabilia in the Roman Empire Thu. November 2nd, 2017
4:30 pm-5:30 pm

The Roman Empire produced a rich range of souvenirs and memorabilia commemorating cities, monuments, sporting and theatrical events, and religious rituals. At a time when literacy was limited and visual communication was essential, these objects were a critical means for generating and mediating memory and knowledge of their represented subjects. This talk examines various examples of Roman souvenirs and memorabilia, including glass flasks engraved with scenes of tourist destinations, miniature replicas of famous cult statues, and drinking cups with pictures of famous gladiators and charioteers. Maggie Popkin, Assistant Professor in the Department of Art History and Art, explores how these objects constructed knowledge in an era before mechanical and digital reproduction.

Continue reading… Faculty Work-in-Progress – Object Memory: Souvenirs and Memorabilia in the Roman Empire

Girih Tiles: Decagonal Geometry in Medieval Islamic Architectural Tilings and Beyond Wed. October 25th, 2017
5:00 pm-6:00 pm

The conventional view holds that geometric star-and-polygon patterns in medieval Islamic architecture were designed using a straightedge and a compass. Peter Lu, a research associate at Harvard University, will present his findings that, instead, a wide variety of patterns with five- and ten-fold symmetry were conceived as tessellations of specific decorated puzzles pieces, called girih tiles, that appear in medieval Islamic architectural scrolls. Beginning in the 12th century, patterns designed with these girih tiles appeared throughout the Islamic world, from North Africa to the Middle East and Central Asia, for more than half a millennium—and in some cases exhibit mathematical principles that we in the West did not understand until the past few decades.

Continue reading… Girih Tiles: Decagonal Geometry in Medieval Islamic Architectural Tilings and Beyond

Faculty Work-in-Progress – Iraq and Syria, 1941: Working Around Lies, Exaggerations, Distortions, and Deletions to Tell a Little-known Story of WWII Tue. October 10th, 2017
12:00 pm-1:00 pm

In spring 1941, the Iraqis and the Vichy French in Syria made agreements with the Axis powers that might have had disastrous consequences for the Allied war effort if the Allies hadn’t improvised a jerrybuilt force to respond. In his talk, Professor Broich, Associate Professor in the Department of History, argues that this fight in Iraq and the Levant had outsized geopolitical importance in part because it was relatively small in scale compared to the titanic battles in North Africa and Russia in the same year. This magnified the importance of the choices made by relatively few people,

Continue reading… Faculty Work-in-Progress – Iraq and Syria, 1941: Working Around Lies, Exaggerations, Distortions, and Deletions to Tell a Little-known Story of WWII

Between Académie and Arsenal: Ships, Servitude and the Sun King Fri. October 6th, 2017
5:00 pm-6:00 pm

In their presentation, Meredith Martin, Associate Professor of Art History at New York University, and Gillian Weiss, Associate Professor of History at Case Western Reserve University, will examine the motif of the chained or enslaved Turk in a wide range of artistic media – ship design, artillery sculpture, medals, paintings, and prints – produced in France during the reign of Louis XIV. Drawing attention to the neglected genre of Mediterranean maritime art and the forced labor integral to its creation, it will explore how servile figures purchased to row on royal galleys also helped build and decorate naval vessels and other artistic forms that circulated between coast and capital to proclaim the power of the Sun King. 

Continue reading… Between Académie and Arsenal: Ships, Servitude and the Sun King

Graduate Student Work-in-Progress: Opera, Shakespeare, and the Creation of Romanticism Thu. October 5th, 2017
4:30 pm-5:30 pm

Shakespeare’s current position atop the global literary pantheon belies a complex history of reception, especially in continental Europe. By examining the collision of early nineteenth-century Shakespeare reception and nascent romantic opera, Musicology PhD candidate Paul Abdullah highlights the entanglements of literary and musical histories for the romantic generation.

Pre-lecture reception begins at 4:15 pm.

Free and open to the public.  Registration recommended. 

Continue reading… Graduate Student Work-in-Progress: Opera, Shakespeare, and the Creation of Romanticism

Rose Wohlegemuth Weisman Women’s Voices Lecture: The New Exploitation Economy Tue. October 3rd, 2017
4:30 pm-5:30 pm

In her lecture, Katherine Boo, staff writer at The New Yorker and a former reporter and editor for The Washington Post, will provide field notes from global reporting on families who lack privilege and power.   Boo’s reporting has been awarded a Pulitzer Prize, a MacArthur “Genius” grant, and a National Magazine Award for Feature Writing.

Free and open to the public.  Registration recommended.  

 

 

 

About the Speaker:

Katherine Boo is a staff writer at The New Yorker and a former reporter and editor for The Washington Post.

Continue reading… Rose Wohlegemuth Weisman Women’s Voices Lecture: The New Exploitation Economy

Humanities@Work: Young Alumni Mon. October 2nd, 2017
6:00 pm-7:00 pm

Panelists discuss how studying the humanities influenced their careers and answer questions from the audience. Panelists include:

Gilad Salomon (CWRU ’10) majored in History and minored in Economics. He joined Bloomberg soon after graduating, working first in New York and then in São Paulo, Brazil, where he became head of marketing for Latin America. He recently left Bloomberg to lead the commercial expansion of a Brazilian, Google-incubated, machine learning enterprise called Emprego Ligado, also in São Paulo.

Violette Robinson (CWRU ’10) majored in both Anthropology and Environmental Studies, and earned an MA in French.

Continue reading… Humanities@Work: Young Alumni

A Humanities@Work Workshop for Undergraduate Humanities Majors: Preparing for the Career Fair Fri. September 29th, 2017
12:30 pm-1:30 pm

Tom Matthews, Executive Director of the CWRU Career Center, will present a general overview for creating effective resumes and will offer practical advice for a successful Career Fair experience. As well, Dr. Matthews will have a directory of the companies represented at the October 5th Career Fair and will provide guidance as to which companies would have the best employment opportunities for humanities students.

Please bring a copy of your current resume to the workshop.

Lunch will be provided.  Registration requested. 

Continue reading… A Humanities@Work Workshop for Undergraduate Humanities Majors: Preparing for the Career Fair

Faculty Work-in-Progress — The Air War in the Museum: The Bombing of Dresden as History and Spectacle Tue. September 26th, 2017
4:30 pm-5:30 pm

Susanne Vees-Gulani, Associate Professor of German in the Department of Modern Languages and Literatures, explores the representations of the 1945 destruction of the famous German baroque city in two new exhibition spaces – the Military History Museum of the German Armed Forces, redesigned by Daniel Libeskind, and the large-scale panorama installations by the architect Yadegar Asisi. Despite vastly different methodologies, both places favor an emotional experience over a factual analysis and in turn create opportunities for developing a new, possibly troubling, German nationalism.

Pre-lecture reception begins at 4:15 pm.

Free and open to the public.  

Continue reading… Faculty Work-in-Progress — The Air War in the Museum: The Bombing of Dresden as History and Spectacle

KeyBank “Lunch and Learn”: Internship Opportunities for Humanities Majors Fri. September 22nd, 2017
12:30 pm-1:30 pm

Are you a Humanities student looking for a Summer Internship or Job? Come learn about the opportunities at Key Bank during this special H@W event with Aqeel Brown, Senior Campus Recruiter. Aqeel will talk about the internship and development programs at Key Bank, explain their applications and hiring process, and answer any questions you might have. One of Cleveland’s largest employers,

Key Bank has openings not just in finance and technology but also:

Human Resources
Marketing Strategy
Operations and many more Humanities-friendly positions!

Lunch will be provided.

Registration requested.  

Continue reading… KeyBank “Lunch and Learn”: Internship Opportunities for Humanities Majors

A Conversation with Peter Ho Davies Wed. September 6th, 2017
4:30 pm-5:30 pm

This event features Peter Ho Davies, recipient of the 2017 Anisfield-Wolf Book Award for Fiction, in conversation with CWRU faculty members Thrity Umrigar and Lisa Nielson. Peter Ho Davies’ innovative novel, The Fortunes, examines the burdens, limitations and absurdities of Asian stereotypes.  In four linked sections, The Fortunes explores the California Gold Rush, actress Anna May Wong, the 1982 murder of Vincent Chin by a disgruntled Detroit autoworker, and the contemporary adoption of a Chinese daughter by American parents. Davies, is a Professor in the Helen Zell MFA Program in Creative Writing at the University of Michigan.

Continue reading… A Conversation with Peter Ho Davies

God and the Big Bang: Discovering Harmony between Science and Spirituality Fri. April 28th, 2017
11:45 am-1:45 pm

Mysticism and science: What do they have in common? How can one enlighten the other? By drawing on modern cosmology and ancient Kabbalah, Matt shows how science and religion can together enrich our spiritual awareness and help us recover a sense of wonder and find our place in the universe. Drawing on the insights of physics and Jewish mysticism, Professor Daniel Matt from the Graduate Theological Union in Berkley, California,  uncovers the sense of wonder and oneness that connects us with the universe and God. He describes in understandable terms the parallels between modern cosmology and ancient Kabbalah.

Continue reading… God and the Big Bang: Discovering Harmony between Science and Spirituality

Faculty Work-in-Progress: The Modernization of Knowledge Tue. April 25th, 2017
4:30 pm-5:30 pm

In his talk, Chris Haufe, Assistant Professor in the Department of Philosophy, compares the individual and community-level practices that have contributed to the growth of scientific knowledge with those that were historically important to the growth of Islamic law and legal theory. This comparison is composed of two independent lines of inquiry. The first looks at the major features that played a role in the historical development of each knowledge tradition. The second line of inquiry compares structural features of knowledge practices across the two traditions.

Pre-lecture reception begins at 4:15 pm.

Free and open to the public.  

Continue reading… Faculty Work-in-Progress: The Modernization of Knowledge

2017 Joseph and Violet Magyar Lecture in Hungarian Studies: Television and the Politics of Nostalgia in Hungary and Eastern Europe Thu. April 20th, 2017
5:00 pm-6:00 pm

In her lecture, Aniko Imre, Professor and Chair of the Division of Cinema and Media Studies at the University of Southern California, provides an overview of how television functioned in Hungary and, more broadly, in the Soviet-controlled region as a medium at the cross-section of the public and domestic spheres, between top-down attempts at political control and bottom-up demands for entertainment and consumption. It highlights some of the program types that were most favored by politicians, media producers and audiences, respectively; and zooms in on the continued popularity of some of these programs in the postsocialist era.

Continue reading… 2017 Joseph and Violet Magyar Lecture in Hungarian Studies: Television and the Politics of Nostalgia in Hungary and Eastern Europe

A Community Conversation About Libraries: Moving From Present to Future Wed. April 19th, 2017
4:00 pm-5:00 pm

This event is a “Soul of Cleveland” dialog.

As demographics, technology, and forms of information dissemination constantly change, libraries of all types must continually adapt to new user behaviors and expectations, and do so within limited resources.  Cleveland is extraordinarily blessed; we have heavily used and nationally recognized public and academic libraries. 

At this event, the leaders of the three largest libraries will serve as a panel to provide a stimulating overview of the issues and opportunities for their respective libraries, and engage with the audience in a dialog to explore what might be coming next. 

Continue reading… A Community Conversation About Libraries: Moving From Present to Future

The Color of Creation and the Creation of Color: Making Art in Ancient Egypt Wed. April 12th, 2017
5:30 pm-6:30 pm

For the ancient Egyptians nothing existed before creation except a dark expanse of endless water. With the creation of the cosmos came light and color. In this talk Gay Robins, Samuel Candler Dobbs Professor of Art History at Emory University, explores the ways in which the Egyptians used color to represent their ideas about the created world, its divine inhabitants, and the king who ruled on earth as the sun god’s representative.

This event is co-sponsored with the Cleveland Museum of Art.

Free and open to the public.  Registration recommended. 

 

Continue reading… The Color of Creation and the Creation of Color: Making Art in Ancient Egypt

Jews and Jazz: Improvising Ethnicity – A Talk with Charles Hersch Thu. April 6th, 2017
5:00 pm-6:00 pm

Music has been an important vehicle for ethnic groups to assert and explore their identities. In his new book Jews and Jazz: Improvising Ethnicity, Professor Hersch looks at how Jewish musicians have used jazz to construct three kinds of identities: to become more American, to emphasize their minority outsider status, and to assert their Jewishness. This talk focuses on “Jewish jazz” – attempts beginning in the 1960s to combine “Jewish music” and jazz. Hersch analyzes these musical forays as attempts to explore and expand modern American Jewish identity. Though Jewish jazz began tentatively, reflecting the assimilationist leanings of American Jews in the post-World War II era,

Continue reading… Jews and Jazz: Improvising Ethnicity – A Talk with Charles Hersch

Building Bridges: Fixing the Immigration Issue and Strengthening U.S.-Mexico Relations Mon. April 3rd, 2017
5:00 pm-6:00 pm

2017 CLEVELAND HUMANITIES FESTIVAL: IMMIGRATION

SEATING CAPACITY FOR THE VENUE HAS BEEN FILLED. REGISTRATION FOR THIS EVENT IS NOW CLOSED.

Immigration reform has long been a priority for President Vicente Fox, who, during his time in office, worked with then-President George W. Bush to negotiate immigration policy. Since leaving office, President Fox continues to emphasize the importance of immigration reform with the goal of building bridges and why America must establish sensible pathways for citizenship for undocumented immigrants. In his speech, President Fox will addresse why immigration reform is crucial not just for America and Mexico,

Continue reading… Building Bridges: Fixing the Immigration Issue and Strengthening U.S.-Mexico Relations

When Away Becomes Home: The Refugee Crisis and Opportunities for Welcome in Northeast Ohio Fri. March 31st, 2017
12:00 pm-1:00 pm

2017 CLEVELAND HUMANITIES FESTIVAL: IMMIGRATION

The world is in the midst of the worst refugee crisis since World War II. Several organizations in Northeast Ohio are actively engaged in resettling individuals and families who have fled from their homelands. What are the stories of these people? And “how are they successfully integrating into our communities, bringing their skills and perspectives to a region poised for growth, but needing some additional resources? That is is the subject of the conversation moderated by Wendy Pearlman, the Martin and Patricia Koldyke Outstanding Teaching Professor at Northwestern University. Prof. Pearlman’s book,

Continue reading… When Away Becomes Home: The Refugee Crisis and Opportunities for Welcome in Northeast Ohio

Lady Mary’s Legacy: Vaccine Advocacy from The Turkish Embassy Letters to Video Games Thu. March 30th, 2017
6:00 pm-7:00 pm

2017 CLEVELAND HUMANITIES FESTIVAL: IMMIGRATION

On April 1, 1717, Lady Mary Wortley Montagu wrote her famous “Letter to a Friend” from the Turkish Embassy, describing the process of smallpox inoculation. With that letter, she became one of the earliest vaccination advocates, joined over the next three hundred years by celebrities and scientists, pop culture icons and heads of state, patients and game developers. In her talk Lisa Rosner, Distinguished Professor of Historical Studies at Stockton University, will explore the colorful and controversial history of vaccine advocacy, the most successful public health measure its beneficiaries love to hate. 

Continue reading… Lady Mary’s Legacy: Vaccine Advocacy from The Turkish Embassy Letters to Video Games

Film Screening and Discussion – I Learn America: One High School, One School Year, Five New Americans Wed. March 29th, 2017
4:30 pm-7:00 pm

2017 CLEVELAND HUMANITIES FESTIVAL: IMMIGRATION

In America, nearly one student in four is a child of immigration. How America fares in welcoming immigrants will determine our identity for the years to come. This film follows five immigrant teenagers over the course of one year at the International High School at Lafayette, a public high school in Brooklyn, NY dedicated to newly arrived immigrants from all over the world. By walking in the shoes of five complex (and in some ways, typical) teenagers who encounter everything from learning a new language, adapting to families they haven’t seen in years,

Continue reading… Film Screening and Discussion – I Learn America: One High School, One School Year, Five New Americans

Who Should Enter the Golden Door: American Immigration Policy in Historical Perspective Wed. March 29th, 2017
12:00 pm-1:00 pm

2017 CLEVELAND HUMANITIES FESTIVAL: IMMIGRATION

Click HERE to view the recording of this lecture.

The current debate about immigration often neglects or misinterprets past “policies” that have related to immigration and citizenship in the United States. In his talk John Grabowski, CWRU’s Krieger-Mueller Joint Professor in History and Historian and Senior Vice President for Research and Publications at the Western Reserve Historical Society, provides a broad historical perspective on not only the creation (or, indeed, the absence) of policy relating to immigration to the United States but on the manner in which citizens and policymakers chose to see immigrants and immigration in relation to economic,

Continue reading… Who Should Enter the Golden Door: American Immigration Policy in Historical Perspective

Internal Immigration and Return: Jewish Renaissance in Sicily and Sardinia Tue. March 28th, 2017
12:00 pm-1:00 pm

2017 CLEVELAND HUMANITIES FESTIVAL: IMMIGRATION

The infamous 1492 Edict of Expulsion of the Jews forced close to 500,000 people into exile. Many had to leave their home-country where they lived for centuries, but still many, with nowhere to go, were pressured into conversion and into what became their “internal immigration.”

Travel with Irene Shaland to the islands of Sicily and Sardinia that present a fascinating chapter in both, the history of immigration and the history of Jewish Diaspora. Discover a world of little-known Jewish narrative: centuries marked by fear and secrets, decades filled with the search for one’s identity,

Continue reading… Internal Immigration and Return: Jewish Renaissance in Sicily and Sardinia

Muslim in America: A Conversation with Ayad Akhtar Mon. March 27th, 2017
5:00 pm-6:00 pm

2017 CLEVELAND HUMANITIES FESTIVAL: IMMIGRATION

Pulitzer Prize winning playwright Ayad Akhtar discusses the Muslim experience in America with Justine Howe, Assistant Professor in the Department of Religious Studies. Akhtar is the author of American Dervish, published in over twenty languages worldwide and a 2012 Best Book of the Year at Kirkus Reviews, Toronto’s Globe and Mail, Shelf-Awareness, and O (Oprah) Magazine. His stage play Disgraced won the 2013 Pulitzer Prize for Drama.  As a screenwriter, he was nominated for an Independent Spirit Award for Best Screenplay for The War Within.

Continue reading… Muslim in America: A Conversation with Ayad Akhtar

A Polish Doctor in the Nazi Camps: My Mother’s Memories of Imprisonment, Immigration, and a Life Remade Fri. March 24th, 2017
12:00 pm-1:00 pm

2017 CLEVELAND HUMANITIES FESTIVAL: IMMIGRATION

REGISTRATION FOR THIS EVENT IS CLOSED. Please email: bakernord@case.edu to be placed on the waiting list.

In her talk, author and anthropologist Barbara Rylko-Bauer will use her mother’s story to talk about broader issues of immigration, examining the echoes from the past that are appearing today.  Her mother’s story is the focus of her book, A Polish Doctor in the Nazi Camps: My Mother’s Memories of Imprisonment, Immigration, and a Life Remade, which weaves personal family narrative with twentieth-century history to present a daughter’s account of her Polish Catholic mother’s World War II experiences as a prisoner-doctor in Jewish slave labor camps in Nazi Germany and the challenges of “surviving survival” – rebuilding a new life,

Continue reading… A Polish Doctor in the Nazi Camps: My Mother’s Memories of Imprisonment, Immigration, and a Life Remade

Imagination and Diaspora in Peter Balakian’s Poetry and Prose Fri. March 24th, 2017
4:30 pm-5:30 pm

2017 CLEVELAND HUMANITIES FESTIVAL: IMMIGRATION

Peter Balakian, Pulitzer-prize winning Armenian American poet and writer and the Donald M. and Constance H. Rebar Professor of Humanities at Colgate University, will discuss the impact of the post genocide Armenian diaspora in his poetry and his memoir Black Dog of Fate.  He will explore how the impact of the history of exile and uprooting can inflect and shape literary imagination and in doing so help create a wider understanding of the legacy of traumatic history.

This event is co-sponsored by the Armenian Cultural Organization.

Continue reading… Imagination and Diaspora in Peter Balakian’s Poetry and Prose

Ancestry Thu. March 23rd, 2017
6:00 pm-7:00 pm

2017 CLEVELAND HUMANITIES FESTIVAL: IMMIGRATION

Henry Louis Gates Jr.’s presents the F. Joseph Callahan Distinguished Lecture, which is also the keynote address for the Baker-Nord Center for the Humanities’ contributions to the Cleveland Humanities Festival. Gates is the Alphonse Fletcher University Professor and director of the Hutchins Center for African and African American Research at Harvard University. A literary critic and filmmaker, he also sits as jury chair of Cleveland’s Anisfield-Wolf Book Awards. He has authored or co-authored 21 books and created 16 documentary films, the latest of which is Black America since MLK: And Still I Rise.

Continue reading… Ancestry

Graduate Student Work-in-Progress – Bioaffect, Medical Memoir, and the Making of a Physician Tue. March 7th, 2017
4:30 pm-5:30 pm

Medical students and physicians in the US are routinely rhetorically positioned as subjects who lack empathy. By examining memoirs that medical students produce about their time in medical school and essay collections written about physicians and empathy, Melissa Pompili, a PhD candidate in the Department of English, identifies the cultural forces at work behind this positioning in order to illuminate how the humanities can bring the physician’s own conception of self into the conversation about the humanity of medical encounters.

Pre-lecture reception begins at 4:15 pm.

Free and open to the public.  

Continue reading… Graduate Student Work-in-Progress – Bioaffect, Medical Memoir, and the Making of a Physician

Platonic Properties Thu. March 2nd, 2017
4:30 pm-5:30 pm

Plato’s Theory of Forms has mostly been conceived by his later readers as a theory of universals or properties: that is, its primary aim is to explain the application of a single expression to distinct entities; or to explain relations of similarity among them. Some moderns disagree, both close readers of Plato’s Greek and thoughtful metaphysicians alive to what it required of a proper realist theory of universals. Dominic Bailey, Associate Professor of Philosophy at the University of Colorado, Boulder, presents fresh reasons for thinking Plato’s theory is not one of universals, but also offers further reasons for why the matter is intrinsically irresoluble: for it requires some assumptions in philosophical psychology that can never with justification be brought to Plato,

Continue reading… Platonic Properties

Humanities@Work: Practical Advice from Human Resources Directors Fri. February 24th, 2017
12:00 pm-1:00 pm

Panelists will discuss how they consider applicants with humanities degrees, how applicants can best explain their skills, and will give humanities students practical advice on resumes, cover letters, and other aspects of the job/internship search from an HR perspective.

Panelists include:

Lonnie Brown is the Talent Acquisition Manager at the Cuyahoga Metropolitan Housing Authority, a nationally recognized leader in providing safe quality affordable housing for individuals and families of Cuyahoga County. Lonnie leads the recruitment and selection efforts to attract, recruit, and hire top internal and external talent for CMHA positions. Lonnie graduated from CWRU with a BA in History and American Studies,

Continue reading… Humanities@Work: Practical Advice from Human Resources Directors

Faculty Work-in-Progress – The Big Sale: Elk Hills, the Energy Crisis, and the Invention of the Neoliberal Market, 1969-1998 Tue. February 21st, 2017
4:30 pm-5:30 pm

In his talk, Peter Shulman, Associate Professor in the Department of History, will discuss the Elk Hills Naval Petroleum Reserve. In the middle of the 20th century, the most valuable piece of federal property was California’s Elk Hills Naval Petroleum Reserve, set aside decades before to provide oil for the military in future emergencies. In 1998, the Clinton administration sold the field for $3.65 billion–still the most expensive divestiture of a single piece of public property in American history. Yet selling this field, a process that actually took over a quarter-century, reveals the fraught ways Americans reconciled increasing national security concerns with a drive to withdraw the federal government from the private economy.

Continue reading… Faculty Work-in-Progress – The Big Sale: Elk Hills, the Energy Crisis, and the Invention of the Neoliberal Market, 1969-1998

Humanities@Work: Politics – A Conversation with Senator Sherrod Brown Mon. February 20th, 2017
5:00 pm-6:00 pm

Please join Ohio’s senior United States Senator Sherrod Brown for a conversation about how studying the humanities prepared him for a career in public service.

Senator Brown majored in the humanities before going on to serve his community in the Ohio House of Representatives, and to serve Ohio as Secretary of State. From 1993 to 2007, he represented Ohio’s 13th congressional district in the U.S. House of Representatives. He has served as Ohio’s United States Senator since 2007, and as senator has held more than 250 community roundtables across Ohio’s 88 counties. He is married to Pulitzer Prize-winning columnist Connie Schultz,

Continue reading… Humanities@Work: Politics – A Conversation with Senator Sherrod Brown

Graduate Student Work-in-Progress – Expanding the Closed Loop: Industrial Conservation, Recycling, and Environmentalism in the United States Tue. February 14th, 2017
4:30 pm-5:30 pm

Contemporary solid waste recycling did not simply arise from the countercultural environmentalism of the late 1960s and 1970s. In this talk, Jon Corey Hazlett, a PhD candidate in the Department of History, explores the historical connections of recycling to conservation efforts developed and promoted by a variety of industries from the 1930s through the 1950s. As environmentalism grew in popularity, these industries worked alongside environmental organizations to shape recycling programs, and the broader movement itself, in terms of market-based initiatives and economic growth, laying the foundation for the “green” consumption that now defines the movement.

Pre-lecture reception at 4:15 pm.

Continue reading… Graduate Student Work-in-Progress – Expanding the Closed Loop: Industrial Conservation, Recycling, and Environmentalism in the United States

Film Screening and Discussion – Paul Laurence Dunbar: Beyond the Mask Thu. February 9th, 2017
5:00 pm-8:00 pm

This documentary looks at the life and legacy of Paul Laurence Dunbar, the first African American to achieve national fame as a writer. Born to former slaves in Dayton, Ohio, Paul Laurence Dunbar (1872-1906), is best remembered for his poem, “We Wear The Mask” and for lines from “Sympathy” that became the title of Maya Angelou’s autobiography “I Know Why The Caged Bird Sings.” Dunbar’s story is also the story of the African American experience around the turn of the century. Frederick Lewis, the program’s writer and director will be on hand to introduce the film and lead a post-screening discussion.

Continue reading… Film Screening and Discussion – Paul Laurence Dunbar: Beyond the Mask

Career Opportunities and Resume Writing for Humanities Majors Fri. February 3rd, 2017
12:00 pm-1:00 pm

Click HERE for the PowerPoint presented at this event.

The recently expanded Humanities@Work program connects CWRU humanities students with corporate, government, nonprofit, and other partners through community discussions, networking events, and paid career opportunities (internship, practicum, etc.) . These exciting opportunities will be shared at this first Humanities@Work event of the semester.

As well, Sylvia Marrero, Assistant Director for Student Outreach at the CWRU Career Center, will provide a general overview for creating effective resumes and will discuss other important aspects of career planning for Humanities majors. This workshop is scheduled to allow students to prepare for the February 13th Career Fair and for the first round of Humanities@Work internship opportunities which will begin in summer,

Continue reading… Career Opportunities and Resume Writing for Humanities Majors

2017 Baker-Nord Distinguished Faculty Lecture : The Sauroktonos (Lizard-Slayer) from Praxiteles to Charles Ray Wed. February 1st, 2017
4:30 pm-5:30 pm

Click HERE to view this event.

In 2004 the Cleveland Museum of Art acquired a rare ancient bronze statue of the type known as Apollo the Lizard-Slayer. In her lecture, Jenifer Neils, Elsie B. Smith Professor in the Liberal Arts in the Department of Classics, takes a deeper look at the style and meaning of this notable Greek sculpture and questions its identity as Apollo and its attribution to Praxiteles. If the Roman poet Martial is to be believed, it may have had an entirely different and sexually charged message for its Roman audience.

Continue reading… 2017 Baker-Nord Distinguished Faculty Lecture : The Sauroktonos (Lizard-Slayer) from Praxiteles to Charles Ray

Humanities@Work: Media Mon. January 30th, 2017
6:00 pm-7:00 pm

Panelists discuss how studying the humanities influenced their careers and answer questions from the audience. Panelists include:

Carlo Wolff (Boston University ’68) majored in English. He contributes news stories and features to the Cleveland Jewish News and writes book reviews for the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette and music reviews for DownBeat. He is the author of Cleveland Rock & Roll Memories (2006), and between 1990 and 2008 worked at Lodging Hospitality, a former Penton Media magazine where he was a longtime Features Editor.

Chris Sheridan (Yale ’89) majored in history. After graduation, she spent nearly two decades writing about education as a reporter and editorial writer in Connecticut and Cleveland before coming to Case Western Reserve in 2007 as President Snyder’s Chief of Staff.

Continue reading… Humanities@Work: Media

Graduate Student Work-in-Progress: American Femmes fatales Thu. December 1st, 2016
4:30 pm-5:30 pm

 

In two recent operas, Anna Nicole (2011) and American Lulu (2013), artists have updated and adapted the genre’s old archetype of the fallen woman – and moved the setting to the American South. In his talk, Nicholas Stevens, a PhD candidate in the Department of Music, demonstrates how the sounds of stateside popular music help European composers and writers remake a fundamentally nineteenth-century storyline. Historical musicology, film and television studies, and cultural theory light the way in this examination of contemporary opera’s American femmes fatales.”

Pre-lecture reception begins at 4:15 pm.

Continue reading… Graduate Student Work-in-Progress: American Femmes fatales

A Place at the Table: An Evening with Chef and Culinary Activist Michael Twitty Thu. December 1st, 2016
7:00 pm-8:00 pm

Renowned chef, food writer and scholar, culinary historian and Judaic studies teacher Michael Twitty examines the emerging topic of culinary justice – the idea that historically oppressed peoples have a right to authority, sovereignty, prosperity and acknowledgment for their contribution to national and global foodways. Join in a lively discussion of how the preparation of food unites and divides narratives and how food can be used for good.

$12 general, $10 Maltz Museum & Cleveland Museum of Natural History Members.

Space is limited.  

CLICK to purchase tickets

 

Continue reading… A Place at the Table: An Evening with Chef and Culinary Activist Michael Twitty

Faculty-Work-in-Progress: Jordan’s Long War Tue. November 15th, 2016
4:30 pm-5:30 pm

Since its inception as a monarchy and a state during World War One, the Hashemite Kingdom of Jordan has participated in or been linked to nearly every major war in the Middle East. From multiple Arab-Israeli wars to civil wars and through to today’s violent conflicts in Syria and Iraq, observers have often portrayed Jordan as “surviving” or “weathering” regional conflict. In his project, Pete Moore, M. A. Hanna Associate Professor of Political Science, charts a different political history of war in the Middle East. It seeks to understand how war making and war preparation have shaped the construction of the Jordanian state and its socio-economic development.

Continue reading… Faculty-Work-in-Progress: Jordan’s Long War

Humanities@Work: Food Mon. November 14th, 2016
6:00 pm-7:00 pm

Panelists discuss how studying the humanities influenced their careers and answer questions from the audience. Panelists include:

Patrick Conway (Loyola University Chicago, ‘74) majored in Urban Studies. He founded the Great Lakes Brewing Company with his brother Dan in 1988.

Noelle Celeste (Yale ‘92) majored in American Studies. She is Director of Advancement for The City Club of Cleveland and Publisher of Edible Cleveland.

Todd Thompson (Kent State ‘95) majored in English. He is Director of Operations and Sommelier at Fire Food and Drink.

Nolan Konkoski(Siena College ‘05) majored in English.

Continue reading… Humanities@Work: Food

Richard N. Campen Lecture in Architecture and Sculpture: Now I Sit Me Down Thu. November 10th, 2016
5:00 pm-6:00 pm

Have you ever wondered where the rocking chair came from, or why cheap plastic chairs are everywhere? The way we choose to sit and what we choose to sit on speak volumes about our values, our tastes, and the things we hold dear. Architect and writer Witold Rybczynski chronicles the history of the chair from ancient Egypt to the present-day. He shows how design, construction, social mores, and aesthetics come together in this ordinary, everyday object.

Free and open to the public.  Registration recommended. 

 

 

 

Continue reading… Richard N. Campen Lecture in Architecture and Sculpture: Now I Sit Me Down

2016 Ubbelohde Lecture: What Ails Democracy? Thu. November 3rd, 2016
7:30 pm-8:30 pm

James T. Kloppenberg, Charles Warren Professor of American History at Harvard University is one of the leading intellectual historians in the United States.  Drawing from the work in his newest book, Toward Democracy: The Struggle for Self-Rule in European and American Thought, and his award-winning 2011 book, Reading Obama: Dreams, Hope, and the American Political Tradition, he will help us consider the historical context of the American political tradition as we reach the culmination of a tumultuous political campaign.

This event is co-sponsored by the Department of History and the CWRU History Associates.

Continue reading… 2016 Ubbelohde Lecture: What Ails Democracy?

Faculty-Work-in-Progress – Walking Stories: Digital literature and a Poetics of Drift Tue. November 1st, 2016
4:30 pm-5:30 pm

In her talk Kristine Kelly, lecturer in the Department of English, reflects on wandering as it figures in the works of digital media artists and storytellers like JR Carpenter and Megan Heyward and also in first-person audio accounts of everyday walkers. These walking stories explore the challenges and pleasures of establishing a sense of place while being, literally, on the move and, also, provoke mobile ways of reading. She suggests that wandering as a practice and theory offers a tool by which one might both recognize and intervene on established geographical, literary, and social orders.

Pre-lecture reception begins at 4:15 pm.

Continue reading… Faculty-Work-in-Progress – Walking Stories: Digital literature and a Poetics of Drift

Faculty-Work-in-Progress – Italy by Way of India: Routes of Devotional Knowledge in the Early Modern Period Tue. October 18th, 2016
4:30 pm-5:30 pm

 

Travel between the vying reliquary sites of St. Thomas Apostle in Chennai, India and Ortona, Italy ruptured narrative continuity in the formation of his European cult while simultaneously fostering a thriving Indian culture of ‘Thomas Christianity.’ The arrival of missionaries and merchants from Italy and Portugal during the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries further complicated the homologous nature of so-called Thomas Christianity and resulted in the production of objects that merge Christian and Hindu iconographies in ways that are here elucidated for the first time. In her talk, Erin Benay, Assistant Professor in the Department of Art History and Art,

Continue reading… Faculty-Work-in-Progress – Italy by Way of India: Routes of Devotional Knowledge in the Early Modern Period

Graduate Student Work-in-Progress – : “Take Polaroid”: Showcasing the American Way of Life in the Soviet Union Thu. October 13th, 2016
4:30 pm-5:30 pm

The American humorist Irene Kampen chronicled her eight-week sojourn to the Soviet Union in the summer of 1969 in her fascinating travelogue, Are You Carrying Any Gold or Living Relatives?, published by Doubleday in 1970. In his talk, Michael Metsner, a PhD candidate in the Department of History, focuses on a particular item neatly packed in Kampen’s luggage for her journey behind the “Iron Curtain”—the Polaroid camera. This modern exemplar of American technological innovation proved to be an irresistible lure for Soviets wherever and whenever Kampen used it in public, but there is much more to the story than simply Soviet enchantment with the latest American gadget.

Continue reading… Graduate Student Work-in-Progress – : “Take Polaroid”: Showcasing the American Way of Life in the Soviet Union

A Sorting Hat for the Digital Humanities:  Content and Design Considerations for Longevity, Access, and Stability Wed. October 12th, 2016
12:00 pm-1:00 pm

A humanities scholar embarking on a digital project often has little guidance in choices he or she must make at a very early stage.  What object formats can be supported now and in the future?  Does my home institution have a view, and how would I know? What if I employ proprietary software and my target publisher or distributor has its own preferred method? Does my project need a long or short lifespan, and what are the consequent considerations? What happens to my materials when I leave or retire? In her talk, Ellen Bauerle, executive editor at the University of Michigan Press,

Continue reading… A Sorting Hat for the Digital Humanities:  Content and Design Considerations for Longevity, Access, and Stability

Boondoggle! The Struggle to Build the Eisenhower Memorial Fri. October 7th, 2016
4:30 pm-5:30 pm

Authorized by Congress seventeen years ago, the Eisenhower Memorial is still on the drawing board. Its design by starchitect Frank Gehry for the National Mall remains unfunded by Congress and the target of a storm of criticism. As a presidentially appointed member of the Eisenhower Memorial Commission, Bruce Cole, Senior Fellow at the Ethics and Public Policy Center and a former Chairman of the National Endowment for the Humanities, had a ringside seat to this saga of power, protest, and politics. His talk will tell the story of the Eisenhower Memorial from its inception to today. It will discuss the history of presidential memorialization (including Cleveland’s Garfield Memorial) and the long and convoluted process of building monuments in our nation’s capitol. 

Continue reading… Boondoggle! The Struggle to Build the Eisenhower Memorial

2016 Issa Lecture: Beyond Words; What Animals Think and Feel Tue. October 4th, 2016
5:00 pm-6:00 pm

 

Does your dog really love you or does she just want a treat? Long thought to be beyond reach of inquiry, Carl Safina, marine ecologist and author most recently of Beyond Words: What Animals Think and Feel, will discuss how animal thought and emotion can be considered by looking at the brain, evolution, and the context of behaviors.

Free and open to the public.  Registration recommended.  

 

 

 

 

About the Speaker:

Carl Safina’s writing about the living world has won a MacArthur “genius” prize,

Continue reading… 2016 Issa Lecture: Beyond Words; What Animals Think and Feel

New Light on Old Papal Rome: Recent Finds from the Archive of the Boncompagni Ludovisi Fri. September 30th, 2016
4:30 pm-5:30 pm

The focus of this talk is the 2010 discovery of archival material that sheds unexpected light on centuries of Boncompagni Ludovisi family history, including the pontificates of Popes Gregory XIII and Gregory XV, and the development of the famed Villa Ludovisi, an enormous private enclave on the Pincio hill in Rome that was for centuries a “must see” stop on the Grand Tour. In 2013 and 2014, T. Corey Brennan, Associate Professor of Classics at Rutgers University, coordinated the first comprehensive videography of the Villa grounds and its spectacular interior spaces, footage that is also featured in his wide-ranging lecture.

Continue reading… New Light on Old Papal Rome: Recent Finds from the Archive of the Boncompagni Ludovisi

2016 Walter A. Strauss Lecture – Censors at Work: How States Shaped Literature Tue. September 27th, 2016
5:00 pm-6:00 pm

The difficulty with the history of censorship is that it looks so simple: it pits oppression against freedom of expression. But if one looks harder, it appears more complicated—and full of surprises. How did censors actually do their work? How did they understand it? And how did it fit into the surrounding social and political context? In his lecture, Robert Darnton, Pforzheimer University Professor and University Librarian Emeritus at Harvard, will discuss how by studying the day-to-day operations of censors under three authoritarian regimes—Bourbon France in the eighteenth century, British India in the nineteenth century, and Communist East Germany in the twentieth century—it is possible to rethink our understanding of censorship in general.

Continue reading… 2016 Walter A. Strauss Lecture – Censors at Work: How States Shaped Literature

Wonder Woman Symposium Fri. September 23rd, 2016
3:00 pm-5:00 pm

Babes in Arms

During World War ll, when the young men left their jobs to fight overseas, women took their places: in the factories, driving trucks and buses, building and flying planes — and in comics.  More women than ever before were drawing for comic books, and what they drew were beautiful courageous women who fought the Axis and didn’t have to be rescued by some guy.  In her talk, cartoonist and historian Trina Robbins, introduces four of those women, who fought the war with ink and paper.

The Goddess,

Continue reading… Wonder Woman Symposium

Humanities@Work: Sports Mon. September 19th, 2016
6:30 pm-7:30 pm

Panelists discuss how studying the humanities influenced their careers. Panelists include:

Amy Backus (Central Michigan University ‘79) majored in education with a minor in English. She is Director of Athletics and Chair of Physical Education at CWRU.

Peter Carfagna (Harvard ‘75) majored in Classics. He is currently Chairman and CEO of Magis, LLC, a sports marketing, consulting and investment firm, with family ownership of the Lake County Captains, Cleveland Indians Class A Affiliate. He is also Co-Director of Case Law School’s Great Lakes Summer Sports and Entertainment Law Academy, and regularly teaches sports law marketing at Harvard,

Continue reading… Humanities@Work: Sports

What Have We Learned About Culture, Disadvantage and Black Youth? Wed. September 14th, 2016
4:30 pm-6:00 pm

Click HERE for the video of this event.

Click HERE an article of the 2016 Anisfield-Wolf Book Awards Ceremony.

A substantial minority of black youth suffer major disadvantages in America–racism; ghettoization; poverty; high drop-out, unemployment and incarceration rates; violence and policy brutality — yet are among the most culturally creative and influential groups in the nation. Social scientists have had only limited success in explaining their plight and their paradoxical role in America’s popular culture, largely due to the reluctance to consider cultural factors. In his talk,

Continue reading… What Have We Learned About Culture, Disadvantage and Black Youth?

High Performance Computing (HPC) Bootcamp Tue. September 13th, 2016
9:00 am-5:00 pm


Big data can be considered any data set outside the scope of a person to adequately process and interpret. Many fields study existing data or data generated via collected, research study, or clinical information. However, students and faculty in English or History or Classics or Law may be interested in querying larger portions of the total textual product of humankind, sets of thousands of texts rather than dozens. Statisticians or Political Scientists or Medical Professionals may be interested in several decades worth of aggregated insurance information or voting records or medical information (textual or image-based).
 

Regardless of the field of study of the nature of your data,

Continue reading… High Performance Computing (HPC) Bootcamp

Big Data in Humanities, Arts, and Social Science Wed. May 11th, 2016
11:00 am-12:00 pm

Data abounds that is of interest to scholars in the humanities, arts, and social science.  High performance computing offers the opportunity to analyze large collections of data to aid in answering questions of interest to humankind, as well as for deriving new questions of interest.  In this talk I will address the kinds of questions and problems that scholars in humanities, arts, and social science face with big data from large text collections, image collections, video collections, network databases and more, and discuss examples of projects that are currently underway. I will discuss how to get started using high performance computing and in particular,

Continue reading… Big Data in Humanities, Arts, and Social Science

Cyberinfrastructure for the study of multimodal communication—language, gesture, art Wed. May 11th, 2016
10:30 am-11:30 am

This talk will review the big data and machine learning methods and instruments developed in the Red Hen Lab for the study of multimodal communication, including our teams of coders in two successive Google Summers of Code, and our collaboration with the CWRU High-Performance Computing Group to create efficient production pipelines.  For more background information, click HERE.

Dr. mark Turner is the Founding Director of the Cognitive Science Network; Co-Director of the Red Hen Lab; winner of the Anneliese Maier Research Prize from the Alexander von Humboldt Foundation, winner of the Prix du Rayonnement de la langue et de la littérature françaises from the French Academy;

Continue reading… Cyberinfrastructure for the study of multimodal communication—language, gesture, art

Cleveland in the Political Crosshairs: A Panel Discussion Tue. May 10th, 2016
5:00 pm-6:00 pm

With the date of the Republican National Convention fast approaching, Cleveland the focus of the nation and the world is turning to us, with possible implications for our city and region. And Cleveland’s politics will be subject to broader scrutiny as well, with increased media attention devoted to our upcoming senatorial and mayoral races, among others. What are the prospects for protests and disruptions during the convention? What impact will that have on Cleveland’s politics? Our city truly is caught in the political crosshairs—join us to discuss what that means.

 

 

Our panel:

Karen Beckwith,

Continue reading… Cleveland in the Political Crosshairs: A Panel Discussion

Symposium – Legacies of Nazi Perpetrators: Looking at Hitler and Himmler Today Thu. April 21st, 2016
4:30 pm-6:30 pm

Brad Prager (University of Missouri, Columbia): “Pinpointing the Evil in Nazi Family Photographs.”

Michael Richardson (Ithaca College): “The Führer’s Face: Images of Hitler in Popular Visual Culture.”

The Holocaust and its perpetrators have left a legacy of evil which has permeated our lives and culture like no other. This mini-symposium features two experts in Holocaust and Visual Studies who will explore visual images of perpetrators in art, literature, film and popular culture. Brad Prager, Professor of German and Film Studies at the University of Missouri, Columbia, will look at the use of photographs of Nazi relatives in order to cope with the National Social past within a German family.

Continue reading… Symposium – Legacies of Nazi Perpetrators: Looking at Hitler and Himmler Today

Surprising Interactions: Unlocking Content through Personal Experience Wed. April 20th, 2016
6:00 pm-7:00 pm

This is event is co-sponsored with Books@Work, which conducts seminars in community and company settings. Students bring to their reading a wide array of personal experiences that shape the way they engage with content–how can we make the most of it? Drawing on their Books@Work seminars, three local professors share how participants use their own life experience to reflect on narrative texts–with compelling results. In a discussion-based format, they will explore how those insights might bring new insights to leveraging experience in the college classroom.

Free and open the public.  Registration recommended. 

Continue reading… Surprising Interactions: Unlocking Content through Personal Experience

Humanities@Work: Entrepreneurs Mon. April 18th, 2016
6:00 pm-6:45 pm

In this panel, designed for undergraduate Students, Cleveland area entrepreneurs will discuss how studying the humanities influenced their careers. Panelists include Kathleen Barrie (art history and studio art) and Dennis Barrie (history and art history), principals at Barrie Projects, a museum and cultural planning firm that specializes in developing unusual and often surprising exhibits and visitor destinations; Rebecca Braun (linguistics and Russian), an entrepreneur, venture development consultant, and author, she is president of The Braun Group, producer of executive memoirs and biographies in a variety of formats; Baiju Shah (history), an entrepreneur in the biomedical field, he is currently CEO of BioMotiv,

Continue reading… Humanities@Work: Entrepreneurs

Food Justice, Food Sovereignty: Transforming our Food System Thu. April 14th, 2016
4:30 pm-5:30 pm

In his lecture, Eric Holt-Giménez, executive director of Food First/Institute for Food and Development Policy, will address the structural inequity and inherent unsustainability of our current food system and the role and challenges for the food movement in systems transformation.

This event is sponsored by the Baker-Nord Center’s Food and Communities Seminar Group, led by Nárcisz Fejes, and is part of the 2016 Food Week.

Free and open to the public.  Registration recommended. 

 

 

 

About the Speaker:

Eric Holt-Giménez,

Continue reading… Food Justice, Food Sovereignty: Transforming our Food System

Warrior Chorus Sun. April 10th, 2016
3:00 pm-5:00 pm

2016  CLEVELAND HUMANITIES FESTIVAL: REMEMBERING WAR

Warrior Chorus is a major new national humanities program by New York’s Aquila Theatre Company, training 100 veterans in four regional centers to present scholar-led public programming based on classical literature.  The programming performed by veterans focuses on critical social issues including war, conflict, comradeship, home, and family and includes veteran-led readings, discussions and the innovative use of New Media. This event will feature a performance by the New York Warrior Chorus, followed by a discussion moderated by Cleveland native and MacArthur Fellow, Professor Thomas Palaima of the University of Texas.  

Continue reading… Warrior Chorus

The Wades in Wartime – 1830-1945 Sat. April 9th, 2016
2:00 pm-3:00 pm

2016 CLEVELAND HUMANITIES FESTIVAL: REMEMBERING WAR

The name Wade is familiar to many in northeast Ohio who enjoy Wade Park, the area surrounding Wade Lagoon, or those who attend Wade Oval Wednesdays.  University Circle is a nationally and internationally respected cultural center thanks, in part, to the generosity and influence of the Wade family.  The 9000+ pages of the Jeptha Homer Wade Family Papers, 1771-1957 in the archives of the Cleveland History Center at WRHS consist of correspondence, diaries, travel journals, autobiographical sketches, deeds, drawings, financial records, and scrapbooks that can be mined shed light on a wide range of topics. 

Continue reading… The Wades in Wartime – 1830-1945

The Baker-Nord Distinguished Faculty Lecture – Thirty Four Miles from Kent State: CWRU and the Vietnam War Fri. April 8th, 2016
4:30 pm-5:30 pm

2016 CLEVELAND HUMANITIES FESTIVAL: REMEMBERING WAR

While not Berkeley or Columbia, Case Western Reserve University became a visible part of American campus unrest in May 1970 when students blocked traffic on Euclid Avenue in the wake of the shootings at nearby Kent State University.  This incident and the student strike that followed serve as the center points of what some remember as a brief campus flirtation with radical protest.   Yet, the story of change and protest at CWRU is much deeper.   In this presentation John Grabowski, CWRU’s Krieger-Mueller Joint Professor in History and Historian and Senior Vice President for Research and Publications at the Western Reserve Historical Society,

Continue reading… The Baker-Nord Distinguished Faculty Lecture – Thirty Four Miles from Kent State: CWRU and the Vietnam War

Feeding War: Gender, Health, and the Mobilized Kitchen in WWI Germany Thu. April 7th, 2016
6:00 pm-7:00 pm

2016 CLEVELAND HUMANITIES FESTIVAL: REMEMBERING WAR

Heather R. Perry, Associate Professor of History at the University of North Carolina, Charlotte, will share her research on World War 1’s impact on the homefront in Germany. Perry’s work provides an overview on medicine, population health, and public policies in wartime, with more in-depth scrutiny of how women and their families coped with privations that impacted their health and well-being. This event is co-sponsored by the Case Western Reserve University Dittrick Medical History Center and is the Center’s 2016 Handerson Lecture.

Free and open to the public.  

Continue reading… Feeding War: Gender, Health, and the Mobilized Kitchen in WWI Germany

Rose Wohlgemuth Weisman Women’s Voices Lecture – Mourning for Lost Art Tue. April 5th, 2016
4:30 pm-5:30 pm

2016 CLEVELAND HUMANITIES FESTIVAL: REMEMBERING WAR

In times of war, why do armies destroy cultural artefacts? And what does it mean when we, far away onlookers, mourn that destruction even as lives are being lost? In this lecture, Pakeistani novelist Kamila Shamsi looks at the role of culture, the threat it poses to those who are fighting for an ideology, and the ethics of our reaction to that destruction.  It also asks what the word ‘lost’ means in relation to art. 

 

 

 

About the Speaker:

Kamila Shamsie,

Continue reading… Rose Wohlgemuth Weisman Women’s Voices Lecture – Mourning for Lost Art

Under Cover of War: The Armenian Genocide and Its Continuing Ramifications Mon. April 4th, 2016
6:00 pm-7:00 pm

2016 CLEVELAND HUMANITIES FESTIVAL: REMEMBERING WAR

World War I provided the cover for the ultranationalist “Young Turk” dictatorship of the Ottoman Empire to take brutal measures to eliminate the native Armenian population. Not only did more than half of the Armenian inhabitants, 1.5 million perish, but the Armenian people was dispossessed of its homeland of several thousand years. Richard Hovannisian, Professor Emeritus at UCLA and Adjunct Professor at USC working with the Shoah Foundation, discusses the reasons for, and the continuing consequences of the Armenian Genocide, including its direct relationship to the Holocaust and other genocides.

Continue reading… Under Cover of War: The Armenian Genocide and Its Continuing Ramifications

Film Screening and Panel Discussion – May 4th Voices: Kent State, 1970 Sun. April 3rd, 2016
2:00 pm-4:00 pm

2016 CLEVELAND HUMANITIES FESTIVAL: REMEMBERING WAR

Screening of the award-winning documentary film May 4th Voices: Kent State, 1970. The film is based on the play May 4th Voices, which comes from the Kent State Shootings Oral History Project, a project that collects and provides access to personal accounts of the May 4, 1970, shootings at Kent State and their aftermath. A panel discussion will immediately follow the screening. Participants will include the playwright David Hassler, Jonathan Shay, and Shannon French of CWRU.

Free and open to the public.  

Continue reading… Film Screening and Panel Discussion – May 4th Voices: Kent State, 1970

Remembering War – Keynote Address: Moral Injury and War Fri. April 1st, 2016
4:30 pm-6:00 pm

2016 CLEVELAND HUMANITIES FESTIVAL: REMEMBERING WAR

What is it about the experience of war that can ruin the lives of the men and women whom we send off to fight? The standard definition of post-traumatic stress disorder is too narrow to account for the psychological wounds inflicted in combat. In his keynote address Jonathan Shay discusses how culture, social systems, mind and body are all implicated when moral injury is the consequence of war. Shay is a doctor and clinical psychiatrist, who is best known for his books, Achilles in Vietnam: Combat Trauma and the Undoing of Character and Odysseus in America: Combat Trauma and the Trials of Homecoming,

Continue reading… Remembering War – Keynote Address: Moral Injury and War

Graduate Student Work-in-Progress – Global Fictions, Religious Violence, and Secularism’s Antinomies of Value Tue. March 29th, 2016
4:30 pm-5:30 pm

For several contemporary novelists, secularism and globalization collide in a way that recasts sociopolitical debates as questions of aesthetic value. By configuring religious practices as models for aesthetic perception, transnational writers such as Salman Rushdie, Mohsin Hamid, and Nadine Gordimer transform contemporary anxieties about religious violence by highlighting art’s vulnerability to the violence of markets and states. Ray Horton, a graduate student in the Department of English, examines how many of today’s most prominent global fictions thus encourage readers to ask how the projects of secularism and globalism are intertwined, and they do so by reaffirming the capacity for art to forge new modes of attention.

Continue reading… Graduate Student Work-in-Progress – Global Fictions, Religious Violence, and Secularism’s Antinomies of Value

Faculty-Work-in-Progress – Attempt at a Mythology Tue. March 22nd, 2016
4:30 pm-5:30 pm

What place do our oldest stories have in twenty-first century poetry? How can contemporary lyric make and unmake myths of its own? In this talk on his manuscript in progress, SAGES Fellow and poet Dave Lucas calls upon the wisdom and failures of these texts to reckon with our own moment in human history, in which we seem collectively balanced on the brink of anthropological and ecological disaster of mythic proportions.

 

 

 

 

 

 About the Speaker:

Dave Lucas is a writer,

Continue reading… Faculty-Work-in-Progress – Attempt at a Mythology

Graduate Student Work-in-Progress – The Amateur Instrument: Teenagers, the Electric Bass, and Garage Bands 1958-1964 Thu. March 17th, 2016
4:30 pm-5:30 pm

 

This lecture examines how the electric bass transitioned in the late 1950s and early 1960s to its current position as rock’s primary low-end instrument. Through an exploration of the musical, social, and economic culture of American teenagers, Brian Wright, a graduate student in the Department of Music, argues that the normalization of the electric bass resulted from the confluence of three distinct historical trends: the popularity of instrumental rock bands like the Ventures, a grassroots influx of self-taught amateur musicians, and the prosperous economic climate of the late 1950s. Analyzing economic data on teenagers and the musical instrument industry as well as cultural texts such as the Sears catalog,

Continue reading… Graduate Student Work-in-Progress – The Amateur Instrument: Teenagers, the Electric Bass, and Garage Bands 1958-1964

Faculty-Work-in-Progress –  From Translation and its Aftermath: The Soviet Legacy in a Post–Socialist Cuba Thu. March 3rd, 2016
4:30 pm-5:30 pm

In her lecture, Damaris Punales-Alpizar, Assistant Professor of Spanish, proposes an approach to the socialist literature in Spanish that was consumed in Cuba from the sixties to the nineties and, following the theories of translation of Itamar Evan-Zohar, attempts to elucidate the peripheral and central role that such literature had in the formation of a Cuban literary polysystem. 

Pre-lecture Reception begins at 4:15 pm in Clark Hall Room 206.

Free and open to the public.  Registration recommended. 

 

About the Speaker:

Damaris Puñales-Alpízar is Assistant Professor in the Department of Modern Languages and Literatures.

Continue reading… Faculty-Work-in-Progress –  From Translation and its Aftermath: The Soviet Legacy in a Post–Socialist Cuba

The Joseph and Violet Magyar Lecture in Hungarian Studies: Hungarian Foreign Policy – Renewed and Adjusted to Today’s Challenges Tue. March 1st, 2016
5:00 pm-6:00 pm

THIS EVENT HAS BEEN CANCELLED DUE TO THE AMBASSADOR’S REQUIRED TRAVEL TO THE HOME OFFICE.  WE HOPE TO RESCHEDULE SOON.  PLEASE WATCH THE WEBSITE FOR UPDATES.

 

H.E. Dr. Réka Szemerkényi, the Ambassador of Hungary to the United States, will discuss current developments in the foreign policy of her country in light of recent events that have unsettled Europe and the international community.

In the last few years we have witnessed major changes and developments in international politics which have challenged the architecture of international system we have known since the 1990 system changes in Europe.

Continue reading… The Joseph and Violet Magyar Lecture in Hungarian Studies: Hungarian Foreign Policy – Renewed and Adjusted to Today’s Challenges

Graduate Student Work-in-Progress – A Comedy in Five Acts: A Gamified Pedagogical Approach to Shakespeare Thu. February 25th, 2016
4:30 pm-5:30 pm

Michelle Lyons-McFarland, a PhD candidate in the Department of English, will explore what it means to take plot, trope, and narrative and turn them into game rules, in effect highlighting them for players/students and audiences. What are the consequences of including social games in the classroom? How can you turn a classic work of literature into a game, either for personal amusement or pedagogical purposes?

Pre-lecture reception begins at 4:15 pm in Clark Hall Room 206.

Free and open to the public.  Registration recommended. 

 

Continue reading… Graduate Student Work-in-Progress – A Comedy in Five Acts: A Gamified Pedagogical Approach to Shakespeare

Humanities@Work:Law Mon. February 22nd, 2016
6:00 pm-7:00 pm

Panelists discuss how studying the humanities influenced their careers.

Panelists include:

Joel Levin (University of Chicago ’82) majored in history and philosophy. As a lawyer at Levin & Associates Co., LPA, he represents victims against wayward banks, financial institutions, lawyers, accountants, police, sheriffs’ offices and prison officials. He has also founded two software development startups.

Maria Del Monaco (Tufts University ’83) majored in English and economics. Formerly a partner at Ulmer and Berne LLP, she now practices as an attorney at the Federal Trade Commission. Susan Friedman (Washington University ’91) majored in political science and English.

Continue reading… Humanities@Work:Law

Faculty-Work-in-Progress – Invisible Women: Gabon’s ‘Empty Canon’ Thu. February 4th, 2016
4:30 pm-5:15 pm

Gabon is unique in that its women writers have historically been predominate in creating its national literature. Despite its many milestones in this area, however, this tiny nation has not received the critical attention that other African neighbors have enjoyed. In her talk, Cheryl Toman, Associate Professor of French, examines the “herstory” of Gabon’s literature which may explain why.

Pre-lecture reception begins at 4:15 pm in Clark Hall Room 206.

Free and open to the public.  Registration recommended. 

 

About the Speaker:

Cheryl Toman is an Associate Professor of French,

Continue reading… Faculty-Work-in-Progress – Invisible Women: Gabon’s ‘Empty Canon’

Exceptional Measures: The Human Sciences in STEM Worlds Thu. January 28th, 2016
5:00 pm-6:00 pm

PLEASE NOTE NEW LECTURE TOPIC

In this lecture, Jerome McGann, John Stewart Bryan Professor at the University of Virginia, discusses the idea that Humanist studies focus primarily on phenomena that is singular, idiosyncratic, and – in a word – personal. As such, they can appear to lack the procedural rigor that we rightly associate with STEM disciplines: Science, Technology, Engineering, Mathematics. But the rigor of humanist studies is not STEM-deficient, it is just STEM-different. We can see the difference most clearly if we seek a philological rather than a philosophical view of the humanities, and if we look at some salient American examples..

Continue reading… Exceptional Measures: The Human Sciences in STEM Worlds

Humanities@Case Fri. January 22nd, 2016
12:30 pm-1:30 pm

Panelists will discuss the resources available specifically to undergraduate humanities students at Case Western Reserve University and answer questions from the audience. Panelists include:

Elizabeth Banks, Director of the Center for Civic Engagement and Learning, will discuss the opportunities for community service and active learning.

Autumn Beechler Stebing, Assistant Director of Education Abroad in the CWRU Center for International Affairs, will discuss the opportunities and process for studying abroad.

Leigh Bonds, Digital Research Services Librarian for the Humanities at Kelvin Smith Library, will provide information about the research support that can be provided to undergraduate humanities students.

Continue reading… Humanities@Case

Edge of Disaster–Vaccines and Epidemics Thu. January 21st, 2016
6:30 pm-7:30 pm

The recent outbreak of Ebola in parts of Africa–and the frightened posts and live-tweets that accompanied two infected health workers as they returned to the US–give us a glimpse not only of an epidemic’s power but of our private terrors. Self-preservation, fear of the unknown, and a desire to protect the boundaries of nations, persons, bodies and cells brings out the best and worst in us. History History provides both sides; the uninfected locked up with the infected in 14th century plague houses, left to starve and suffer in the dark–or doctors like Cleveland’s Horace Ackley, who personally combated and contained an outbreak of Asiatic cholera in Sandusky in 1849.

Continue reading… Edge of Disaster–Vaccines and Epidemics

Poetry Reading with Dan Beachy-Quick Fri. November 20th, 2015
3:00 pm-4:00 pm

Dan Beachy-Quick, a Monfort Professor teaching in the MFA Creative Writing Program at Colorado State University, joins the English Department’s colloquium for a poetry reading. He is the author of several books of poetry including North True South Bright (2003), Spell (2004), Mulberry (2006), This Nest, Swift Passerine (2009), Circle’s Apprentice (2011, Winner of the Colorado Book Award in Poetry) and gentlessness (2015). He is also the author of a book of interlinked meditations on Herman Melville’s Moby-Dick, titled A Whaler’s Dictionary (2008) and a collection of essays, meditations, and fairy tales, Wonderful Investigations (2012). Beachy-Quick is the recipient of a Lannan Foundation Residency and has been a finalist for the Colorado Book Award,

Continue reading… Poetry Reading with Dan Beachy-Quick

Faculty-Work-in-Progress: Trash, Place, and Chinese Ecocinema: On Wang Jiuliang’s Eco-Documentaries Thu. November 19th, 2015
12:00 pm-1:00 pm

What does ecocinema mean for Chinese cinema? In his talk, Haomin Gong, Assistant Professor in the Department of Modern Languages and Literatures, takes two documentaries, Beijing Besieged by Waste and Plastic China, made by the Chinese filmmaker Wang Jiuliang as examples, and investigates the issues of place and displacement in the forming of the discourse of trash in contemporary China.  

An informal lunch will be served.

This event is free and open to the public.  Registration recommended. 

Continue reading… Faculty-Work-in-Progress: Trash, Place, and Chinese Ecocinema: On Wang Jiuliang’s Eco-Documentaries

A Talk in the Vineyard with Mansfield Frazier Wed. November 18th, 2015
4:30 pm-5:30 pm

Community activist and entrepreneur Mansfield Frazier leads The Vineyards and BioCellar of Château Hough, an urban vineyard located in Cleveland at the intersection of East 66th and Hough where grapes are grown for award-winning wines. They also operate the world’s first experimental underground greenhouse.  He will discuss how these projects utilize innovative educational and entrepreneurial strategies in the growing field of urban agriculture to encourage, prepare and assist at-risk youth, veterans, and those who are returning — or who have already returned — to their home neighborhoods after a period of incarceration in creating safer, greener, healthier and wealthier places to live,

Continue reading… A Talk in the Vineyard with Mansfield Frazier

Cuban Literature Today: Tendencies and Perspectives Mon. November 16th, 2015
5:00 pm-6:00 pm

THIS EVENT HAS BEEN CANCELLED.   

Continue reading… Cuban Literature Today: Tendencies and Perspectives

Poetry Reading by Jorie Graham Fri. November 13th, 2015
3:00 pm-4:00 pm

Due to family illness, this event has been CANCELLED.  A reading with poet Dan Beachy-Quick has been scheduled for Friday, November 20 at 3 pm.  Click HERE for more information and to register for that event.

 

Continue reading… Poetry Reading by Jorie Graham

Graduate Student Work-in-Progress: Black Entertainment in the Heart of Cleveland’s “Colored District,” 1922-30 Tue. November 10th, 2015
4:30 pm-5:30 pm

Peter Graff, a graduate student in the Department of Music, will discuss how Cleveland’s Globe Theater (Woodland avenue and E. 55th street), once a venue for live Yiddish entertainment, rebranded itself in 1922 to capitalize on the city’s burgeoning black population. Audiences packed the house nightly to see and hear the latest blues queens, black musical revues, and the occasional race picture. As a site for these converging artistic traditions by and for African Americans, the Globe played a significant role in shaping the identity of Cleveland’s black community in the 1920s.

Pre-lecture reception begins at 4:15 pm.

Continue reading… Graduate Student Work-in-Progress: Black Entertainment in the Heart of Cleveland’s “Colored District,” 1922-30

Humanities@Work: CEOs Mon. November 9th, 2015
6:00 pm-7:00 pm

During this event planned for undergraduate students, Cleveland area CEOs discuss how studying the humanities influenced their careers.  Panelists include:

Marc S. Byrnes (Williams College ‘76) majored in history. He is former CEO and current chairman of Oswald Companies, one of the nation’s largest independent insurance brokerage and risk management firms.

Ronald B. Richard (Washington University ‘78) majored in history. He is president and CEO of the Cleveland Foundation, established in 1914 as the world’s first community foundation.

Frank Sullivan (University of North Carolina ‘83) majored in English.

Continue reading… Humanities@Work: CEOs

Baker-Nord Faculty Lecture: Where Do Characters Come From? Wed. November 4th, 2015
5:00 pm-6:00 pm

Readers come to books in search of characters they can love, hate, empathize with or relate to. But how do writers create characters that are realistic and who remain with the reader after he or she is done with a novel? In this talk, Thrity Umrigar, Professor of English at Case Western Reserve University and bestselling author of the novels The Space Between Us, If Today Be Sweet, Bombay Time, The Weight of Heaven and The World We Found, explains her own writing process.

This event is free and open to the public.  

Continue reading… Baker-Nord Faculty Lecture: Where Do Characters Come From?

CWRU English Colloquium Series: What Was Historicism? Fri. October 30th, 2015
3:00 pm-4:00 pm

A generation ago, a “new historicism” blew like a fresh breeze through the stuffy institution of literary criticism; now, after decades of success, it is routinely attacked as a stuffy institution itself. So it seems a good time to think back over what it was and what happened to it. This lecture will argue that more is at work than the destined fading of new fashions into the old-fashioned; it will explore the nature of the movement’s innovations, the substance of its accomplishments, and the self-defeating logic enclosed in both.

Steven Justice is Chancellor’s Professor of English at UC Berkeley,

Continue reading… CWRU English Colloquium Series: What Was Historicism?

Faculty-Work-in-Progress: UPA and Modernist Cartoon Music Tue. October 27th, 2015
4:30 pm-5:30 pm

The United Productions of America (UPA) animation studio, which came to prominence on the big and small screen in the years following World War II, profoundly changed animation from the dominance of Disney’s naturalistic approach to a more modern, even avant-garde style, with cartoons like Gerald McBoing-Boing and the Mister Magoo series. In his talk Daniel Goldmark, Associate Professor in the Department of Music, will discuss the atypical approach UPA took to music in the animation soundscape, which included music taken from a variety of genres and styles, composers coming from widely different backgrounds, and a general disavowal of the Hollywood approach to cartoon scoring.

Continue reading… Faculty-Work-in-Progress: UPA and Modernist Cartoon Music

“Lost” Between Memory and History: Writing the Holocaust for the Next Generation Thu. October 22nd, 2015
6:00 pm-7:00 pm

Daniel Mendelsohn, Charles Ranlett Flint Professor of Humanities at Bard College, draws upon his experience researching, writing, and then touring The Lost around the world. He explores the meaning of the Holocaust as both a historical and a literary event as time passes and the event belongs to a new generation of writers, and readers, who no longer have direct contact with the event itself. A bit provocatively, he suggests that the “never forget” injunction is, essentially, anti-literary: that literature–because it forges a large, manageable narrative out of historical events for cultures to use–has to “forget”

Continue reading… “Lost” Between Memory and History: Writing the Holocaust for the Next Generation

Inamori Ethics Prize Academic Symposium Fri. October 16th, 2015
12:30 pm-2:00 pm

As part of the 2015 Inamori Ethics Prize events, prize recipient Professor Martha Nussbaum will participate in a lively, moderated discussion with international experts and audience Q&A on her groundbreaking Capabilities Approach to global ethics that gives practical direction for seeking justice and positive change for those who cannot access opportunities or enjoy the basic freedoms they need to flourish and unlock their potential. 

This event is free and open to the public.  Registration recommended. 

Please register HERE.

Continue reading… Inamori Ethics Prize Academic Symposium

The 2015 Inamori Ethics Prize Ceremony and Lecture: Human Development and the Capabilities Approach in Global Ethics  Thu. October 15th, 2015
6:00 pm-7:30 pm

The 2015 Inamori Ethics Prize will be awarded to celebrated philosopher and scholar Martha Nussbaum, the Ernst Freund Distinguished Service Professor of Law and Ethics at the University of Chicago. As part of the prize ceremony, Professor Nussbaum will present a lecture on her signature work that has been at the forefront of the principal contemporary ethical issues. Along with economist Amartya Sen, Nussbaum has reoriented conversations of international welfare efforts away from exclusive focus on GDP and toward the capabilities of a nation’s individuals.

This event is free and open to the public.  Registration Required.  

Continue reading… The 2015 Inamori Ethics Prize Ceremony and Lecture: Human Development and the Capabilities Approach in Global Ethics 

Graduate Student Work-in-Progress: Illustrating Little Manhood & Erasing Black Boyhood in African American Picture Books  Thu. October 8th, 2015
4:30 pm-5:30 pm

Cara Byrne, a graduate student in the Department of English, will examine the complexities of visualizing black male identity, especially for and about young black boys. There is a long legacy of picture books that teach young African American boys to become “little men,” leaving behind childish ways to demonstrate rigid maturity and asexual masculinity. This project ultimately contends that many African American picture books not only respond to generations of hate crimes and discrimination but also that black authors and illustrators use the genre as a way to protect the youngest generation and seek social justice.

Continue reading… Graduate Student Work-in-Progress: Illustrating Little Manhood & Erasing Black Boyhood in African American Picture Books 

Book Publishing in the Humanities Mon. October 5th, 2015
12:00 pm-1:00 pm

The publishing process for scholars in the humanities is often a confusing one, especially for first-time authors. Today’s shifting landscape of scholarly publishing, with new formats and media for disseminating and promoting scholarship, confronts a would-be author with numerous choices.  This lecture is meant to serve an introduction to academic book publishing, with an emphasis on the humanities.  Stefan Vranka, Executive Editor for scholarly and trade publications in Classics, Ancient History, and Archaeology, will help to demystify the path from first inquiry and proposal to printed books and beyond.

This event is free and open to the public.  

Continue reading… Book Publishing in the Humanities

The Rita Hayworth of this Generation: A Solo Play Starring Tina D’Elia Sat. October 3rd, 2015
7:00 pm-9:00 pm

The Rita Hayworth of this Generation is the story of Carmelita Cristina Rivera, a queer Latina performer, who is ready to premier her show, an homage to Rita Hayworth, in a seedy Las Vegas nightclub.  She feels this will make her a star, but enter the Transgender Playboy, Jesus Antonio Gitano.  Camelita falls for Jesus and enters a world of magical realism where dead Hollywood Movie Stars collide with the living.

Admission is free thanks to the generous support of the Flora Stone Mather Center for Women, the LGBT Center, the Office of Multicultural Affairs,

Continue reading… The Rita Hayworth of this Generation: A Solo Play Starring Tina D’Elia

Graduate Student Work-in-Progress: From the Street to the Stage: Popular Song and the Construction of Parisian Spectacle, 1648-1713 Tue. September 29th, 2015
4:30 pm-5:30 pm

As a Fulbright scholar in Paris for the 2014-2015 academic year, John Romey,a graduate student in the Department of Music, undertook an enormous archival project that catalogued and analyzed manuscript chansonniers and print sources documenting song texts that circulated in street culture. This talk will aim to use broad strokes to present the types of songs that were performed in the streets and on the Pont Neuf in Paris, and to outline how these song practices functioned within early modern communication networks. It will offer better insight into the nexus connecting the streets and the stage by revealing that in seventeenth-century Paris the Comédie-Italienne and the Comédie-Française adapted the repertoire and cultural practices that constituted the quotidian soundscape of seventeenth-century Parisian public spaces.

Continue reading… Graduate Student Work-in-Progress: From the Street to the Stage: Popular Song and the Construction of Parisian Spectacle, 1648-1713

“Secrets of old Philisoffres”: The Secretum Secretorum and Premodern Gerontology Thu. September 24th, 2015
4:30 pm-5:30 pm

This event has been cancelled.

Continue reading… “Secrets of old Philisoffres”: The Secretum Secretorum and Premodern Gerontology

The Soul of Cleveland Mon. September 21st, 2015
5:30 pm-7:00 pm

Hear about the street named for a poet, an Idea Garage, our forgotten entrepreneurs passionate about our waterways and from the audience. The Soul of Cleveland project derives from a celebration in discussion form. From January to June, a book store owner, naturalist, award-winning Cleveland writer, art historian and owner of a bakery, educators and architects met to determine how we “feel” about this city? What lifts our spirits, gives us hope, moves us to community action? The undertow.  This event will capture stories coming from these discussions and community surveys.  Dan Moulthrop, CEO of The City Club of Cleveland will moderate.

Continue reading… The Soul of Cleveland

Humanities@Work: Medicine Mon. September 21st, 2015
6:00 pm-7:00 pm

During this event planned for undergraduate students, panelists discuss how studying the humanities influenced their careers.  Panelists Include:

Mark Warren (Wesleyan ’75) put together his own major in American Studies. He is a psychiatrist and Chief Medical Office of the Emily Program, which provides a full spectrum of treatment for eating disorders. 

Ashley Faulx (Swarthmore ’88) majored in art history. She is a gastroenterologist at University Hospitals Case Medical Center and the director of Endoscopy at the Louis Stokes VA Medical Center.

Jeremy Lipman (Boston College ‘99) majored in English.

Continue reading… Humanities@Work: Medicine

Unrepentant Traveler, Accidental Diplomat: Gabriela Mistral, Latin America’s First Nobel Laureate and Feminist Icon Fri. September 18th, 2015
4:30 pm-5:30 pm

How did a mixed-race woman, born into poverty in the remote Andes, whose formal education ended with primary school become a literary celebrity? Biographer Elizabeth Horan will point to the challenges and rewards of researching a figure whose vast network, achieved through travel, correspondence and published writings, made her the most powerful woman in the Spanish-speaking world. She became the confidante of Senators and Presidents. This lecture will reveal the surprising range and secrets of her influence as a symbol of the Americas.

This event is co-sponsored by the CWRU Department of Modern Languages and Literatures.

Continue reading… Unrepentant Traveler, Accidental Diplomat: Gabriela Mistral, Latin America’s First Nobel Laureate and Feminist Icon

Navigating Pathways of Support: A Panel for Graduate Students on Research Resources at Case Western Reserve University Thu. September 17th, 2015
12:00 pm-1:00 pm

Digital humanities initiatives around campus are up and running, meaning that we are ready to help you build, develop, collaborate on and fund digital scholarship! Have an idea for a project? Bring it along and our panelists will help you find the support you need! Want more training? We will discuss our ongoing workshops.

The panel will include representatives from ITS Academic Technology, ITS Research Computing, Kelvin Smith Library, and the Baker-Nord Center for the Humanities.

 

Registration is requested as Lunch will be provided. 

 

Continue reading… Navigating Pathways of Support: A Panel for Graduate Students on Research Resources at Case Western Reserve University

9/11 Chronomania: Terror and the Temporal Imagination Fri. September 11th, 2015
3:00 pm-4:00 pm

For billions around the world, the events of 9/11 were experienced as a rupture, a periodizing event that cast the world into a new period of danger and uncertainty. Whether it signaled the end of a brief era of optimistic globalism or a bold retaliation against an ungodly global hegemon, understood as a deeply historical event or an apocalypse outside ordinary time, one of 9/11’s most salient effects has proved to be temporal in nature. The experience of temporal disorientation and unsettlement has been of paramount importance to the narratives that address the attacks and contend with their unfolding legacy in the subsequent decade.

Continue reading… 9/11 Chronomania: Terror and the Temporal Imagination

A Tale of Two Plantations: a Comparative Approach to Caribbean and U.S. Slavery Wed. September 9th, 2015
5:00 pm-6:00 pm

Richard Dunn, Roy F. and Jeannette P. Nichols Professor Emeritus of American History at the University of Pennsylvania and winner of a 2015 Anisfield-Wolf Book Award, has reconstructed the individual lives and collective experiences of two thousand slaves who lived on Mesopotamia sugar estate in western Jamaica and Mount Airy plantation in Tidewater Virginia.  He compares slave life on the two plantations in order to demonstrate the huge demographic difference between the British Caribbean and the U.S. slave systems–drastic population loss at Mesopotamia and vigorous population growth at Mount Airy–and shows how the black people on both plantations suffered horribly,

Continue reading… A Tale of Two Plantations: a Comparative Approach to Caribbean and U.S. Slavery

Religion and Secularism across the Humanities: An Interdisciplinary Forum Wed. May 6th, 2015
2:00 pm-4:00 pm

A Baker-Nord Working Group Event
 

Over the past decade, numerous disciplines in the humanities and social sciences have spoken of a “religious turn.” This pattern is characterized by a resurgent interest in interdisciplinary scholarship that revaluates central questions about the relationship between religion and secularism in the academy and in our objects of study.

 

This roundtable discussion will feature five scholars from our region, and will consider the variety, the diversity, and the critical stakes involved in these debates. Short presentations related to each scholar’s current research will be followed by an extensive open discussion of the questions and claims raised by the panelists.

Continue reading… Religion and Secularism across the Humanities: An Interdisciplinary Forum

Literature, Sexuality, and the Postsecular: Intersections and Possibilities – A Workshop Wed. April 29th, 2015
11:00 am-12:00 pm

What is “the postsecular,” and why should it matter to the study of literature and sexuality? Exploring various possible answers, this workshop emphasizes the significance of recent debates in secularization theory to scholarly analyses of non-normative and transnational representations of sexual subjectivities.

 

This workshop is sponsored by “The Religious, the Secular, and the New Humanities,” a research working group of the Baker-Nord Center for the Humanities. A catered lunch will immediately follow the event (RSVP required). To receive a PDF copy of the material that Dr. Jones will discuss, and to RSVP if you wish to attend the lunch,

Continue reading… Literature, Sexuality, and the Postsecular: Intersections and Possibilities – A Workshop

Humanities@Work: MEDICINE Mon. April 27th, 2015
6:00 pm-7:30 pm

Four doctors and a medical student will discuss how studying the humanities influenced their careers. Participants include:

Mark Scher (Rochester ‘72) majored in history and biology. He is Professor of Pediatrics and Neurology at the Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine and Division Chief in Pediatric Neurology at Rainbow Babies and Children’s Hospital at University Hospitals Case Medical Center.

Neal J. Meropol (Princeton ‘81) majored in philosophy. He is the Dr. Lester E. Coleman, Jr., Professor of Cancer Research and Therapeutics and Chief of the Division of Hematology and Oncology at University Hospitals Case Medical Center and Case Western Reserve University.

Continue reading… Humanities@Work: MEDICINE

The Body in the Book: the Fabrica and the Epitome (1543) Thu. April 16th, 2015
6:00 pm-7:00 pm

 

December 2014 marked the 500th anniversary of the birth of Andreas Vesalius and medical history institutions across American and Europe are marking this occasion with celebratory exhibitions and programs. To commemorate Vesalius’ legacy, the Cleveland Medical Library Association is hosting this special public lecture by Sachiko Kusukawa.

Dr. Kusukawa is a Fellow in History and Philosophy of Science, Trinity College, Cambridge University, and her research has focused on the observational, descriptive and pictorial practices in the development of scientific knowledge in the early modern period (1500-1720). Her work on visual arguments in sixteenth-century botanical and anatomical works resulted in Picturing the book of nature,

Continue reading… The Body in the Book: the Fabrica and the Epitome (1543)

Who Started World War I? Centenary Debates about War Guilt and Meaning Wed. April 15th, 2015
4:30 pm-6:00 pm

A Niagara of new histories has greeted the centenary of the outbreak of World War I, and none more impressive or widely-read than Christopher Clark, Sleepwalkers: How Europe Went to War in 1914 (Harper, 2013). In his very title, Clark paints a portrait of European statesmen asleep at the wheel, stumbling blindly into a war that waking people would have avoided. The logic of this interpretation spreads responsibility for the mis-steps that led to war evenly among all participants, returning to interpretations dominant from the mid 1920s to 1961 and causing major controversy in Germany in particular. This talk traces the history of how historians have assessed diplomatic and moral responsibility for the outbreak of World War I from 1914 to the present,

Continue reading… Who Started World War I? Centenary Debates about War Guilt and Meaning

2015 F. Joseph Callahan Distinguished Lecture: “The Flight From Conversation” Mon. April 13th, 2015
6:00 pm-7:00 pm

2015 Callahan Distinguished Lecture presents professor, author, clinical psychologist Sherry Turkle on how technology is shaping our relationships

With personal communication dominated by texts, tweets and online posts, some wonder if social technology has hollowed out what it means to be social—that we are losing the art of conversation with disturbing consequences.

Sherry Turkle, a professor, author and licensed clinical psychologist, has spent the last 30 years researching the psychology of people’s relationships with technology and, in particular, how technology is shaping our modern relationships—with others, with ourselves, with it.

Turkle, often described as “the Margaret Mead of digital culture,” offers a unique perspective on technology and social interaction,

Continue reading… 2015 F. Joseph Callahan Distinguished Lecture: “The Flight From Conversation”

Reading Interfaces: Inquiries at the Intersection of Literature and Technology Fri. April 10th, 2015
11:00 am-5:00 pm

A Baker-Nord Digital Humanities Event
Curated by Kristine Kelly and Allison Schifani

Free and open to the public, registration recommended. 

Electronic literature presents and generates literary performances that display, question, and critique ways of reading and modes of literary production in the digital age. This exhibition of electronic literature will display and discuss works of electronic and print literature and bring to attention the technologies central to their production. The accompanying colloquium will include public presentations on the history of the book, theories of electronic literature, and lectures by producers of electronic texts.

Continue reading… Reading Interfaces: Inquiries at the Intersection of Literature and Technology

The 2015 Edward S. and Melinda Melton Sadar Lecture in Writing in the Disciplines – Form, Subject, and Genre: Toward a History of Copyright for Newspaper and Magazine Writings Fri. April 10th, 2015
3:00 pm-4:00 pm

With respect to copyright law, periodicals have followed a different trajectory than books, and much of that difference has to do with the heterogeneous nature of newspapers and magazines. In the early twentieth century, periodicals in the United States and Great Britain obtained blanket copyrights that covered most of their contents, but this logic did not apply to the much more fluid textual universe of the nineteenth century. The timing of the first copyright claims, and the extent to which these claims were respected, depended upon evolving attitudes toward the genre and subject matter of the texts in question. Serial novels were treated differently than poems,

Continue reading… The 2015 Edward S. and Melinda Melton Sadar Lecture in Writing in the Disciplines – Form, Subject, and Genre: Toward a History of Copyright for Newspaper and Magazine Writings

Reading Interfaces: Inquiries at the Intersection of Literature and Technology Thu. April 9th, 2015
12:00 pm-7:00 pm

A Baker-Nord Digital Humanities Event
Curated by Kristine Kelly and Allison Schifani

Free and open to the public, registration recommended. 

Electronic literature presents and generates literary performances that display, question, and critique ways of reading and modes of literary production in the digital age. This exhibition of electronic literature will display and discuss works of electronic and print literature and bring to attention the technologies central to their production. The accompanying colloquium will include public presentations on the history of the book, theories of electronic literature, and lectures by producers of electronic texts.

Continue reading… Reading Interfaces: Inquiries at the Intersection of Literature and Technology

The Joseph and Violet Magyar Lecture in Hungarian Studies: Counter-Constitutions: How a 21st Century Constitutional Revolution in Hungary Claimed Medieval Roots Thu. April 9th, 2015
4:30 pm-6:00 pm

Since independence in 1989, nationalist Hungarians have argued that the Holy Crown of St. Stephen and associated doctrines should be at the core of Hungary’s constitution. Kim Lane Scheppele – Rockefeller Professor of Sociology and International Affairs at Princeton University – will discuss how the Crown is both a literal object given by the Pope to the first Christian king of Hungary, in the year 1000 and – since medieval times – a key symbolic touchstone in the constitution of state power. Professor Scheppele will examine how the Crown became an object venerated by the right and denigrated by the left of the Hungarian political spectrum.

Continue reading… The Joseph and Violet Magyar Lecture in Hungarian Studies: Counter-Constitutions: How a 21st Century Constitutional Revolution in Hungary Claimed Medieval Roots

Reading Interfaces: Inquiries at the Intersection of Literature and Technology Wed. April 8th, 2015
4:00 pm-7:30 pm

A Baker-Nord Digital Humanities Event
Curated by Kristine Kelly and Allison Schifani

Free and open to the public, registration recommended. 

Electronic literature presents and generates literary performances that display, question, and critique ways of reading and modes of literary production in the digital age. This exhibition of electronic literature will display and discuss works of electronic and print literature and bring to attention the technologies central to their production. The accompanying colloquium will include public presentations on the history of the book, theories of electronic literature, and lectures by producers of electronic texts.

Continue reading… Reading Interfaces: Inquiries at the Intersection of Literature and Technology

The 2015 biennial Beamer-Schneider Lecture in Ethics & Civics: “There is a crack in everything; that’s how the light gets through” Tue. April 7th, 2015
6:00 pm-7:00 pm

This lecture is presented by Michael Rakowitz who will discuss his social experiments categorized as “social practice art.” He will also be starting his project in Cleveland centered around the Tamir Rice killing: the redaction of orange. Click HERE for more information about “A Color Removed”.

Rakowitz is an internationally renowned artist at the forefront of social practice art. His projects on Palestine, Iraq, veterans, and homelessness have led him to shows in the Tate Modern, London and to the collection of MoMA, New York City.

Continue reading… The 2015 biennial Beamer-Schneider Lecture in Ethics & Civics: “There is a crack in everything; that’s how the light gets through”

Cultural Waves: The Ancient Greek Contribution to Human Rights Thu. April 2nd, 2015
4:00 pm-5:00 pm

The U.S. government’s use of “enhanced interrogation techniques” since 9/11 has made the topic of basic human rights newly urgent. Professor Sternberg suggests that human rights concepts arose from humane discourse that developed in “cultural waves.” Through close philological work on ancient pity, Greek oiktos and eleos, she discovered that Athenians of the classical period (the 5th and 4th centuries BCE) invented humane values, even though they conspicuously failed to live up to them. In this, they resembled Thomas Jefferson, who owned more than 175 slaves when he wrote in the Declaration of Independence that all men are created equal and are entitled to “Life,

Continue reading… Cultural Waves: The Ancient Greek Contribution to Human Rights

Talking Back to the Book: Critical Digital Literacies in African American Rhetorical Traditions Wed. April 1st, 2015
4:30 pm-6:00 pm

In this talk, Adam Banks, Professor of Writing Rhetoric and Digital Studies at the University of Kentucky, will consider Stevie Wonder’s exploration of technologies in his pursuit of artistic independence from Motown in the early 1970s as an invocation and deployment of the Talking Book, a trope of literacy for freedom emerging from Black oral traditions.  He will argue that the Talking Book offers educators and community builders a framework for a critical digital literacy that helps us understand contemporary African American engagements with technologies like Twitter and can inform work with technologies in schools and community spaces.

Continue reading… Talking Back to the Book: Critical Digital Literacies in African American Rhetorical Traditions

An Afternoon with Patricia Harman Fri. March 27th, 2015
12:00 pm-1:30 pm

Best-selling author Patricia Harman will read from and discuss her latest book, The Reluctant Midwife, the story of a young nurse-midwife in West Virginia during the Great Depression. Harman, a certified nurse-midwife, is a former faculty member of Case Western Reserve University’s Frances Payne Bolton School of Nursing.

A book sale and signing will follow the discussion.  An informal lunch with be served.

Free and open to the public.  Registration recommended. 

 

 

 

About the speaker:

Patricia Harman,

Continue reading… An Afternoon with Patricia Harman

How to Retract an Article in the Humanities Wed. March 25th, 2015
12:00 pm-1:30 pm

A Baker-Nord Digital Humanities Event
 

There are significant differences between the kind of support that humanists typically provide for their arguments, on the one hand, and the kind of support scientists provide for their arguments, on the other. The standard mode of support in the humanities makes it nearly impossible to imagine circumstances in which the retraction of a publication was warranted, whereas this is routine in science.

The possibility of retraction is not peculiar to science. It is a feature of any culture of inquiry that prioritizes the prevention of error propagation. Humanists owe some sort of explanation for why we are apparently unconcerned with error propagation.

Continue reading… How to Retract an Article in the Humanities

Making, Mining, Marking and Mashing: The Digital Humanities Curriculum in 2025 Wed. March 25th, 2015
4:30 pm-6:00 pm

A Baker-Nord Digital Humanities Event

Mills Kelly, Professor of History at George Mason University, will challenge the audience to think about what the humanities curriculum will look like ten years hence. How will advances in digital media change the ways that students learn about and make sense of the humanities, and how should humanities departments begin changing their curricula to prepare students for advanced thinking about the big ideas in the humanities?

Free and open to the public.  Registration Recommended. 

 

 

 

 

 

Continue reading… Making, Mining, Marking and Mashing: The Digital Humanities Curriculum in 2025

Collectors, Collections and Museums: Chinese Ceramics in Britain, 1560-­‐1960 Wed. March 25th, 2015
6:30 pm-7:30 pm

During the 16th and 17th centuries, Chinese ceramics were acquired as objects of exoEca and vessels for the consumpEon of tea and coffee, as well as for display in the country house interior. DiplomaEc and poliEcal conflicts of the 18th and 19th centuries prompted a shiR in BriEsh consumpEon of pieces as both spoils of war and iconic representaEons of China. PercepEons of China and its ceramics began to change significantly in the 20th century with objects acquired as works of art and displayed publicly in museums. Art historian and curator Stacey Pierson explores the collecEng, consumpEon and display of Chinese porcelain in Britain which culminated in the founding of a museum of Chinese ceramics in London by one of the foremost BriEsh collectors,

Continue reading… Collectors, Collections and Museums: Chinese Ceramics in Britain, 1560-­‐1960

Identity, Authority, and Authenticity in Language Policy: Reflections from the Peruvian Andes Mon. March 23rd, 2015
4:30 pm-6:00 pm

The Baker-Nord Center for the Humanities, the Speakers Committee of the Department of Modern Languages and Literatures, and the Program of Women’s and Gender Studies present this lecture by Virginia Zavala.  Zavala is a Professor in the Department of Humanities (Linguistics Section) at Pontificia Universidad Catolica in Lima, Peru.

Professor Virginia Zavala obtained her Ph.D. in Sociolinguistics at Georgetown University. Her research interests revolve around the way language use constructs power relationships and subjectivities, especially in the educational context and in multilingual scenarios. Her work includes studies of bilingual programs and policies, revitalization of indigenous languages, multilingual literacies and classroom discourse.

Continue reading… Identity, Authority, and Authenticity in Language Policy: Reflections from the Peruvian Andes

The Julius Fund Lecture in Medieval Art: Real Monsters: Medieval Belief, Wonder, and the “Wonders of the East” Wed. March 18th, 2015
5:30 pm-7:00 pm

Professor Asa Simon Mittman from California State University, Chico, will present the Julius Fund Lecture in Medieval Art, sponsored by the Department of Art History and Art.

 

A reception will follow.

Continue reading… The Julius Fund Lecture in Medieval Art: Real Monsters: Medieval Belief, Wonder, and the “Wonders of the East”

Faculty Work-in-Progress: Eteocles in the Hermeneutic Circle Mon. March 16th, 2015
4:30 pm-6:00 pm

Sophocles’ tragedy Oedipus the King is well-known. Few, however, know that Aeschylus wrote a dramatic trilogy about the family of Oedipus. Aeschylus’s The Seven against Thebes, the only surviving play from the trilogy, deals with Oedipus’ son Eteocles, who defends Thebes from an army of attackers led by his own brother Polyneices. Eteocles, like Oedipus, is unable to understand his part in the complex matrix of life. In this talk, Timothy Wutrich, an instructor in the Department of Classics, considers the success of Aeschylus’s trilogy when it was first produced in 467 B.C. and its place in Greek theater history.

Continue reading… Faculty Work-in-Progress: Eteocles in the Hermeneutic Circle

On Not Reading David Foster Wallace Fri. March 6th, 2015
3:00 pm-4:00 pm

There are over fifty thousand novels published in the United States every year. Readers, reviewers, and scholars talk a lot about why one might read certain books; in this talk, Amy Hungerford, Professor of English at Yale University, asks how we decide, and how we talk about, what not to read in the context of literary over-production. She takes as a case study the decision not to read a work that is newly becoming canonized—David Foster Wallace’s Infitine Jest. The argument reflects on feminist reading practices, what counts as rigor in literary studies, and what we expect out of the works we canonize.

Continue reading… On Not Reading David Foster Wallace

The Long Now of Digital Humanities Thu. March 5th, 2015
4:30 pm-6:00 pm

A Baker-Nord Digital Humanities Event
 

 

Digital Humanities has been called “the culture of the perpetual prototype.” The fast pace of technological change makes it challenging to plan for the long-term future of digital projects, and yet a flourishing culture of digital scholarship demands that we balance the need for innovation against the need for stability and longevity. This presentation will consider the Women Writers Project as an example of a very long-term digital publication and research project, now in its 26th year, and will talk about the tools, methods, and intellectual challenges that have helped sustain this project and given it a durable role in the evolving landscape of digital humanities.

Continue reading… The Long Now of Digital Humanities

Introduction to Text Encoding with TEI Wed. March 4th, 2015
9:00 am-5:00 pm

A Baker-Nord Digital Humanities Event
 

The Workshop will run 4-6 March 2015. Participants should plan to attend all three days.

This event has ended.

This three-day workshop is designed for individuals who are contemplating embarking on a text-encoding project, or for those who would like to better understand the philosophy, theory, and practicalities of encoding in XML (Extensible Markup Language) using the Text Encoding Initiative (TEI) Guidelines. No prior experience with XML is assumed, but the course will move quickly through the basics.

 

Continue reading… Introduction to Text Encoding with TEI

Performance and Discussion of “Asking for It” Tue. March 3rd, 2015
7:00 pm-9:00 pm

The Flora Stone Mather Center for Women, in collaboration with the Cleveland Rape Crisis Center presents Asking For It, which follows one woman’s hysterical and heart-breaking journey from “Outstanding Catholic Youth of the Year” to the stage of Radio City Music Hall and the cast of “A Chorus Line”. Tap dancing her way through rape, rehab, and wrecked relationships, Asking for It is a joyful kaleidoscope of faith and femininity, sexual repression and spiritual awakening. Rush portrays a colorful cast of characters ranging from uptight clerics to sexy chorines, and growing boys of all ages.

Continue reading… Performance and Discussion of “Asking for It”

Neoliberal Practices and Cultural Production in Latin America in the Past 40 Years Fri. February 27th, 2015
5:00 pm-6:30 pm

PLEASE NOTE NEW LOCATION!
Idelber Avelar – a professor specializing in contemporary Latin American fiction, literary theory, and Cultural Studies at Tulane University – will address the effects of neoliberal practices in the production of culture, the transformation of state economies into transnational flow of goods, and how both of these factors have worked to position the discourse of memory as a new cultural and economic commodity.

This event is sponsored by the Baker-Nord Center’s Neoliberal Practices and Cultural Production in America Latina in the Last 40 Years thematic seminar group.

Free and open to the public.  

Continue reading… Neoliberal Practices and Cultural Production in Latin America in the Past 40 Years

Lecture by Deborah Willis and Screening of “Through the Lens Darkly: Black Photographers and the Emergence of a People” Fri. February 27th, 2015
4:00 pm-7:00 pm

Deborah Willis, PhD is University Professor and Chair of the Department of Photography & Imaging at New York University/Tisch and has an affiliated appointment in Africana Studies.  She was a 2014 Richard D. Cohen Fellow of African and African American Art History at the Hutchins Center, Harvard University, a 2005 Guggenheim Fellow and Fletcher Fellow, and a 2000 MacArthur Fellow.  Her notable projects include “The Black Female Body: A Photographic History” with Carla Williams and “Reflections in Black: A History of Black Photographers – 1840 to the Present,” the focus of the documentary film, “Through the Lens Darkly.”

Continue reading… Lecture by Deborah Willis and Screening of “Through the Lens Darkly: Black Photographers and the Emergence of a People”

NEH Grant Writing Workshop Wed. February 25th, 2015
9:00 am-12:30 pm

Stefanie Walker, Senior Program Officer for Research Programs at the National Endowment for the Humanities, will be on campus to provide information and answer questions about current NEH funding opportunities.  The Workshop takes place in two sections:

General NEH Overview: 9 – 10:45 am

Mock Panel Review: 11:00 am – 12:30pm

Faculty participants in the mock panel are:

Timothy Beal, The Florence Harkness Professor of Religion
Renee Sentilles, Associate Professor of History
T. Kenny Fountain, Associate Professor of English

In addition, Robert G. Colby, PhD, program officer at Ohio Humanities,

Continue reading… NEH Grant Writing Workshop

Freedman Fellows: Tornado Destruction & Financial Damage to Homeowners Wed. February 25th, 2015
12:00 pm-1:30 pm


A Digital Humanities Event
 

Dr. Gallagher will discuss his research, as well as the challenges it has presented and how the Freedman Fellows program provided both solutions and support.

 

Dr. Gallagher’s project focuses on how the receipt of federal public assistance following a devastating natural disaster affects individuals’ finances and migration decisions. Data on the destruction paths of tornadoes are being correlated with financial and migration information using GIS software. The project’s overall goal is to better understand how individuals respond to uncertain environmental risks and how the Federal government can best protect citizens while not distorting individual incentives to live in environmentally safe and sustainable locations.

Continue reading… Freedman Fellows: Tornado Destruction & Financial Damage to Homeowners

The Issa Lecture: Interspecies Ethics Tue. February 24th, 2015
4:30 pm-6:00 pm

Cynthia Willett, a Professor in the Department of Philosophy at Emory University, draws upon animal studies and relational ethics to propose transpecies ideals of communitarianism and cosmopolitan peace. Expanding our understanding of human and animal capacities begins with appreciating the capacity in ourselves and other animals for wonder and acts of moral beauty. These capacities call for a paradigm shift in moral philosophy.

A reception in Clark Hall Room 206 will immediately follow the lecture.

Free and open to the public.  Registration recommended. 

 

 

 

 

Continue reading… The Issa Lecture: Interspecies Ethics

Faculty Work-in-Progress: Honoring the Prophet, Performing American Islam Wed. February 18th, 2015
12:00 pm-1:30 pm

For centuries, Muslims have performed mawlids, or festivals and celebrations in honor of the Prophet Muhammad. These rituals came under attack in the twentieth-century, critiqued as either harmful innovations from early Islamic models or as superstitious practices incompatible with modernity. In this lecture, Justine Howe, Assistant Professor of Religious Studies, examines the resurgence of mawlids in Chicago-area Muslim institutions. Through a deliberate use of language, experiments in devotional piety, and increased participation of women, the mawlid provides the ritual context for its practitioners to embody their particular vision of American Islam.

An informal lunch will be served.

Continue reading… Faculty Work-in-Progress: Honoring the Prophet, Performing American Islam

The Story of the Cleveland Play House Mon. February 16th, 2015
5:30 pm-8:00 pm


Founded in 1915, the Cleveland Play House remains the longest-running professional theatre in the country, but its history has never been studied by anyone outside of the institution itself. Jeffrey Ullom – Assistant Professor of Theater and Director of the Undergraduate Program in Theater at Case Western Reserve University – contextualizes the history of Cleveland’s famous theater to look beyond the subjective legacy and explore how and why this institution is able to persevere decade after decade. This event is co-sponsored with The Laura & Alvin Siegal Lifelong Learning Program.

Cost for dinner and lecture is $40.  

Continue reading… The Story of the Cleveland Play House

Chemistry in Art, Art in Chemistry, and the Spiritual Ground They Share Thu. February 12th, 2015
4:30 pm-6:00 pm


After looking at the evolution of pigments for the color blue, Roald Hoffmann – Frank H. T. Rhodes Professor of Humane Letters Emeritus at Cornell University and recipient of the 1981 Nobel Prize in Chemistry – will discuss how scientific articles relating to chemistry also deal with representation of an underlying reality, and face questions that are essentially artistic. The presentation will address the spiritual ground shared by art and a science as it poses the question Is there an analogue in science to abstract art?

This lecture is sponsored by the Baker-Nord Center’s Science and the Humanities thematic seminar group.

Continue reading… Chemistry in Art, Art in Chemistry, and the Spiritual Ground They Share

Issues on 20th and 21st Century Art Wed. February 11th, 2015
5:00 pm-6:00 pm

Anuradha Vikram is a curator, critic, and educator, currently Director of Residency Programs at 18th Street Arts Center, in Santa Monica, CA. From her pedagogical and curatorial experience, Vikram will expand on the productive intersections of Art as Research, Arts as Engagement, and Art as Politics.

This lecture is an integral part of a joint seminar between Case’s Department of Art History and The Cleveland Institute of Art, taught by the artist José Carlos Teixeira, Champney Family Visiting Professor at CWRU and CIA.

This event is co-sponsored by the CWRU Department of Art History & Art and the Cleveland Institute of Art.

Continue reading… Issues on 20th and 21st Century Art

Freedman Fellows Presentation: Tibet Oral History and Archive Project Wed. February 11th, 2015
12:00 pm-1:30 pm


A Digital Humanities Event
 

Dr. Goldstein will discuss his research, as well as the challenges it has presented and how the Freedman Fellows program provided both solutions and support.

 

Dr. Goldstein and the Center for Research on Tibet have been collecting and translating oral history interviews and documents relating to modern Tibetan history and society for over three decades. These materials, all of which are part of the Tibet Oral History and Archive Project (TOHAP), are a unique and invaluable primary source on the social and political history of modern Tibet and Sino-Tibetan relations.

Continue reading… Freedman Fellows Presentation: Tibet Oral History and Archive Project

“Rockwell Kent” Screening and Discussion Mon. February 9th, 2015
5:00 pm-8:30 pm

Artist and social activist Rockwell Kent produced haunting landscapes inspired by his adventures in Alaska, Tierra del Fuego, and Greenland. For more than ten years, producer/writer Frederick Lewis, associate professor in the School of Media Arts and Studies at Ohio University, retraced the nomadic artist’s many travels, shooting footage in Greenland, Newfoundland, Alaska, Ireland, and Russia to produce this film, which documents how Kent’s travel experiences inspired his artistic work. A discussion with Frederick will immediately follow the film screening.

Free and open to the public.  Registration recommended. 

 

 

Continue reading… “Rockwell Kent” Screening and Discussion

Animating the War: The First World War and the History of Animation Thu. February 5th, 2015
4:30 pm-6:00 pm


The history of animation dates back to the 1890s, yet the medium as we know it was deeply shaped by the events of the First World War. In this talk, Donna Kornhaber – Assistant Professor of English at the University of Texas at Austin and author of numerous articles on the history of animation and the book Charlie Chaplin, Director – explores the role that the Great War played in the modern development of animation in terms of its subject matter, style, humor, and relationship to violence. Works to be considered range from animated shorts of the pre-war period to cartoon serials of the 1920s and 1930s.

Continue reading… Animating the War: The First World War and the History of Animation

Second Look Film Series: My Architect Mon. January 26th, 2015
6:00 pm-8:00 pm

This Oscar-nominated documentary features director Nathaniel Kahn searching to understand his father, noted architect Louis Kahn, who died bankrupt and alone in 1974. He explores his father’s past, interviewing architects such as Frank O. Gehry, as well as members of the multiple families started by the philandering Louis. What emerges is a portrait of a brilliant but unreliable man whose creations,which are featured prominently in the film, still astound.

Introduced by Cleveland architect Sally Levine, an instructor in the CWRU Department of Art History and Art.

Free and open to the public. Registration recommended. 

 

Continue reading… Second Look Film Series: My Architect

Humanities Graduate Student Happy Hour Thu. January 22nd, 2015
5:00 pm-7:00 pm

All Case Western Reserve University Graduate Students are invited to attend the first Baker-Nord Center Humanities Graduate Student Happy Hour.  Please join us for some snacks, a drink or two, and a chance to meet and network with graduate students from all of the CWRU humanities departments.

Registration requested. 

Continue reading… Humanities Graduate Student Happy Hour

Blackboard as a Digital Pedagogical Tool Thu. January 8th, 2015
9:00 am-12:00 pm

Free and open to the public, registration recommended. 

 

This essential workshop will explore tactics to effectively use Blackboard for teaching. In addition to offering participants a broad overview of the platform’s capacities, this workshop will provide hands on training in its use.

This is a two day workshop; participants should plan to attend both days. The second part will be held on January 9th.

Participants should bring their laptop.

 

 

About the speakers

Katie Skapin

Katie Skapin is an Instructional Technologist with Case Western Reserve University’s Information Technology Services group.

Continue reading… Blackboard as a Digital Pedagogical Tool

An Introduction to DH Theory Tue. December 2nd, 2014
1:30 pm-1:00 pm

A Baker-Nord Digital Humanities Event
This talk will offer a general introduction to the theoretical debates in the field of digital humanities in addition to exploring some of the ways digital practitioners have used their skills and projects to advocate for the humanities across disciplines.

 

 

 

 

 

 

About the speaker
Allison Schifani

 

Allison Schifani received her PhD from the Graduate Program in Comparative Literature at the University of California,

Continue reading… An Introduction to DH Theory

Screening of “The Unknown Known” Mon. December 1st, 2014
1:00 pm-1:00 pm

Errol Morris’ documentary — a riveting extended interview with former Secretary of Defense Donald Rumsfeld — is a cat-and-mouse game in which each player – interviewer & interviewee – thinks he’s the cat, making it both thrilling and disconcerting to watch. It is also a nature documentary about behavior at the very top of the imperial food chain, as well as a detective story about the search for a mystery that is hidden in plain sight. Morris weaves the central interview through archival footage, poetic images, and an evocative musical score — all of which makes for a powerful work of cinema.

Continue reading… Screening of “The Unknown Known”

Faculty Work-in-Progress: Electric Baton: Science, Sound, and the Romantic Conductor Thu. November 20th, 2014
4:30 pm-5:30 pm

Hector Berlioz — along with Louis Spohr and Felix Mendelssohn — is often cited as the first of the modern conductors, a larger-than-life figure at once magisterial, quasi-magical and military. Among the formative moments of his conducting career was his concert at the Exposition universelle (Paris, 1855), which established him as a musical leader of formidable power. Key to Berlioz’s success was a new wedding of music with technology: the implementation of an “electric baton.” Francesca Brittan — associate professor of Music — will explore the nature of his device and, more broadly, the ways in which electricity and telegraphy emerged as factors central to romantic notions of conducting.

Continue reading… Faculty Work-in-Progress: Electric Baton: Science, Sound, and the Romantic Conductor

DH in the Classroom: A Primer Tue. November 18th, 2014
1:00 am-1:00 am

A Baker-Nord Digital Humanities Event
In this general discussion and presentation of a broad range of digital humanist tools, this workshop will offer instructors, faculty and graduate students an overview of technology that can be integrated into humanist pedagogy.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

About the speakers
Lee Zickel

Lee has developed, proposed, and been accepted to a Multidisciplinary PhD program that combines Information Systems and Organizational Behavior with Cognitive Linguistics.

Continue reading… DH in the Classroom: A Primer

Metamorphoses of Medea Fri. November 14th, 2014
4:30 pm-5:30 pm

 
A Baker-Nord Cosponsored Event
 

“Killer!” “Barbarian!” “Witch!” “Madwoman!” “Heroine!” Ever since Euripides staged his drama Medea in 431 BCE Athens — a play about marital passion, betrayal, and explosive revenge — the character of Medea has been called all these names and much more. Distinguished professor of Classics, Mary-Kay Gamel, will explore how Medea has been depicted in drama, poetry, visual art, music, and film, asking “What makes this figure so fascinating?” And how — even in our era in which graphic violence is prevalent throughout our media — the play continues to intrigue,

Continue reading… Metamorphoses of Medea

Exhibits & Collections Thu. November 13th, 2014
1:00 am-1:00 pm

A Co-presented Digital Humanities Event
A general introduction for students, faculty, and staff to the processes of digitizing text and images, building collections/exhibits/archives using the Omeka platform, and writing Dublin Core metadata for the items contained therein. Essential for researchers whose work is archival and visual.

About the speakers
Leigh Bonds

Leigh Bonds serves as the Digital Research Services Librarian. In addition to her duties as a reference and subject librarian, she supports faculty and student digital scholarship production, project management, and data curation. She holds PhD in English with specialization in nineteenth-century British literature,

Continue reading… Exhibits & Collections

The Richard N. Campen Lecture in Architecture and Sculpture: Across Art and Architecture Thu. November 13th, 2014
1:00 am-1:00 am

Using examples from her own creative practice, Monica Ponce de Leon, Dean and Eliel Saarinen Collegiate Professor of Architecture and Urban and Regional Planning at the University of Michigan, will discuss the ever-shifting relationship between artistic production and the architectural project. At the center of the lecture she tackles pre-conceived notions about design, creativity, and the power of imagination.

About the speaker
Monica Ponce de Leon

Monica Ponce de Leon, AIA, was appointed Dean and Eliel Saarinen Collegiate Professor of Architecture and Urban Planning of University of Michigan’s Taubman College of Architecture and Urban Planning in September,

Continue reading… The Richard N. Campen Lecture in Architecture and Sculpture: Across Art and Architecture

Shakespeare in America Wed. November 5th, 2014
4:30 pm-5:30 pm

Shakespeare has played a significant role in American literary and political culture since the time of the Revolution. Drawing upon his recent anthology for the Library of America — “Shakespeare in America”– James Shapiro, Larry Miller Professor of English and Comparative Literature at Columbia University, considers the alternative history of our nation conveyed in the work of representative American authors, exploring how Shakespeare has served a means to confront some of the issues that have long divided us as a nation.

This lecture, in memory of Walter A. Strauss (1923-2008), who was the Elizabeth and William T.

Continue reading… Shakespeare in America

What Can We Learn about Language by Reading Millions of Books? Thu. October 30th, 2014
4:30 pm-5:30 pm

A Faculty Works-In-Progress
The dramatic growth of linguistic corpora enables the quantitative study of language on a scale that would have been unimaginable even five years ago. In this talk, Harsh Mathur, Associate Professor of Physics, will describe what we might learn about the evolution of language from such studies, using the regularization of verbs as a concrete example.

 

 

 

 

 
About the speaker
Harsh Mathur

Harsh Mathur is an Associate Professor of Physics at Case Western Reserve University.

Continue reading… What Can We Learn about Language by Reading Millions of Books?

Digital Project Management Fri. October 24th, 2014
12:30 pm-3 pm

A Baker-Nord Digital Humanities Event
This presentation will propose a transformation of the digital humanities so that innovations are sociological and not only technical. Martha Nell Smith — Distinguished Scholar-Teacher and Professor of English at the University of Maryland and Founding Director of the Maryland Institute for Technology in the Humanities — will offer critical observations re digital archives related to the poems of Emily Dickinson. These examples will be used to recommend ways in which methods generated by feminist critical theory can advance the work of digital humanities, scholarly editing, and information studies. Professor Smith will argue that the frozen social relations of old critical orders can and should be thawed in order to enable sociological innovations,

Continue reading… Digital Project Management

TEI Without Tech: An Introduction to TEI Concepts Thu. October 23rd, 2014
1 pm-3 pm

A Baker-Nord Digital Humanities Event
 

Text encoding allows researchers to closely explore texts using the XML mark-up language. Prior to processing the works they want to examine, tagging parts of speech, themes, places, characters, historical figures and more, scholars work to understand the key questions that undergird material texts as they are transformed into machine readable data. What are the important markers on a manuscript, text, or image? What does the visual layout of the text do to or for readers? Who are the speaking and writing voices in a text? What function does the layout have?

Continue reading… TEI Without Tech: An Introduction to TEI Concepts

Visibility, Exclusion, and Futures of Digital Humanities: Time for a Thaw Thu. October 23rd, 2014
6 pm-7 pm

 

 

 
A Baker-Nord Digital Humanities Event
This presentation will propose a transformation of the digital humanities so that innovations are sociological and not only technical. Martha Nell Smith — Distinguished Scholar-Teacher and Professor of English at the University of Maryland and Founding Director of the Maryland Institute for Technology in the Humanities — will offer critical observations re digital archives related to the poems of Emily Dickinson. These examples will be used to recommend ways in which methods generated by feminist critical theory can advance the work of digital humanities,

Continue reading… Visibility, Exclusion, and Futures of Digital Humanities: Time for a Thaw

I Do and I Don’t: A Discussion of Marriage in the Movies Mon. October 13th, 2014
4:30 pm-5:30 pm

As long as there have been feature movies there have been marriage movies, and yet Hollywood has always been cautious about how to label them–perhaps because, unlike any other genre of film, the marriage movie resonates directly with the experience of almost every adult coming to see it. Jeanine Basinger, Corwin-Fuller Professor of Film Studies, founder and curator of the Wesleyan Cinema Archives, and Chair of the Film Studies Department at Wesleyan University. traces the many ways Hollywood has tussled with this tricky subject, explicating the relationships of countless marriages in the movies.

 

 

About the speaker
Jeanine Basinger

 

Continue reading… I Do and I Don’t: A Discussion of Marriage in the Movies

What is College For? Thu. October 2nd, 2014
4:30 pm-5:30 pm

Educators at all levels–from early childhood through college and university– are contending with rising public anxiety about the cost and value of education. Andrew Delbanco, Director of American Studies and Julian Clarence Levi Professor in the Humanities at Columbia University and author of College: What it Was, Is, and Should Be?, will speak about the past, present, and future of a distinctive institution that is under growing pressure: the American college.

How well are we doing at helping students become active citizens and fulfilled human beings–and how can we do better? How best to teach in the digital age?

Continue reading… What is College For?

Screening of “The Square” Mon. September 22nd, 2014
6 pm-8 pm

A nominee for best documentary feature at the 2014 Oscars, The Square is an immersive experience, transporting the viewer deep into the intense emotional drama of the ongoing Egyptian Revolution. The film – an inspirational vibrant, lyrical, sobering account of young people struggling through multiple forces, in the fight to create a society of conscience – stands as a soaring testament to both aesthetic and political expression.

 

The film will be introduced by Pete Moore, Associate Professor of Political Science, CWRU.

 

 

 

 

Continue reading… Screening of “The Square”

An Afternoon with Anthony Marra Wed. September 10th, 2014
4:30 pm-5:30 pm

Author Anthony Marra will read from and discuss “A Constellation of Vital Phenomena”, winner of the 2014 Anisfield-Wolf Book Award for fiction. His novel – set in a nearly abandoned hospital in war-torn Chechnya – tells the story of eight-year-old girl Havaa, the neighbor who rescues her after her father’s disappearance, and Sonia, the doctor who shelters her over five dramatic days in December 2004.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

About the speaker
Anthony Marra
In addition to the 2014 Anisfield-Wolf Book Award for Fiction,

Continue reading… An Afternoon with Anthony Marra

The Lives of Others: The Novel as a Looking Glass Sat. May 31st, 2014
8:45 am-10:00 am

A Baker-Nord Cosponsored Event
Thrity Umrigar is an award-winning journalist and author of five novels and a memoir. Her newest novel, The Story Hour, will be published in 2014. This is the keynote address for Breaking Genre: In the Context of Others, a writers conference. Only the keynote and book fair are free and open to the public. The conference will also feature presentations by Mary Biddinger, Joyce Dyer, Michael Grant Jaffe, Phil Metres, Lynn Powell, James Sheeler, S. Andrew Swann, Samuel Thomas, and Cinda Chima Williams. For more information, email writersconference@case.edu. Event co-sponsored by the Department of English.

Continue reading… The Lives of Others: The Novel as a Looking Glass

The Protean Virgil: Book History and the Reception of Aeneid 1 in the Renaissance Fri. April 25th, 2014
1:00 pm-1:00 pm

VERGIL WEEK – A Baker-Nord Cosponsored Event
This talk will focus on how the beginning of the Aeneid was read in the Renaissance. The emphasis will not be on Virgilian influence on the great writers of the period, but on how the poem was read at school, to provide a part of the common cultural foundation of the early modern period. Examination of the early printed editions read by Renaissance readers and the marginal annotations they left in their books shows that the Aeneid was generally read in a three-step process. First, lines that are memorable for their moral content or their stylistic polish would be underlined and a key word to identify the line would be written in the margin of the book.

Continue reading… The Protean Virgil: Book History and the Reception of Aeneid 1 in the Renaissance

Unworkable Hermeneutics Thu. April 24th, 2014
4:30 pm-5:30 pm

A Baker-Nord Digital Humanities Event
Digital Humanities scholarship, among other things, is focused on the question of interpretation. Most notable in initiatives such as topic modeling, where algorithms are employed to identify unnoticed patterns in texts or time periods, hermeneutics (the study of interpretation) dominates one facet of Digital Humanities thinking. Yet, hermeneutics is merely an interface for engaging with a text or idea. In this talk, Jeff Rice, Martha B. Reynolds Professor in Writing, Rhetoric, and Digital Studies at the University of Kentucky, asks how an unworkable Digital Humanities interface, such as hermeneutics, prevents certain types of digital work from occurring,

Continue reading… Unworkable Hermeneutics

Rockwell Kent and Greenland Thu. April 17th, 2014
1:00 am-1:00 am

A Humanities Related Event
Painter, author, illustrator, adventurer, social activist, ROCKWELL KENT (1882-1971) was one of America’s most influential and important artists reaching his greatest popularity during the 1930’s and 1940’s. His creative versatility was legendary. Best known as the definitive illustrator of such literary classics as Moby Dick, Candide and The Canterbury Tales, Rockwell Kent’s iconic images became permanent fixtures of the human imagination. An incurable wanderer, he traveled to extreme cold, harsh environments such as Alaska, Tierra del Fuego and Greenland to paint and record his mythical visions. Making three lengthy trips in the early 1930’s to an island off the northwest coast of Greenland,

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Mapping Ibuse Masuji’s “Kuroe Ame” Wed. April 16th, 2014
1:00 pm-1:00 pm

A Freedman Fellows Presentation
Since the atomic bombing on August 6, 1945, the name “Hiroshima” has come to signify less the name of a city than an unthinkable event or an incalculable fear of nuclear war. While an official culture of commemoration has grown up around the site of the actual bombing, Mark Pedretti examines literary artifacts that paint a very different image of the city, and suggests a different form of historical memory. Drawing primarily upon Ibuse Masuji’s 1965 novel Black Rain (Kuroe Ame), along with photographic archives of Hiroshima both before and after the bombing,

Continue reading… Mapping Ibuse Masuji’s “Kuroe Ame”

Biotechnical Ecologies: Lively Participation in the Contemporary City Tue. April 15th, 2014
4:30 pm-5:30 pm

A Baker-Nord Faculty Works-in-Progress
City space is fast becoming the central playground for the experiential, political and ideological forces shaping lives and discourses both within the specific boundaries of urban centers, and across the globe. Schifani’s ongoing research explores ways of creating and participating in contemporary urban space, with a particular focus on the new media technologies and ecocritical tactics that urban dwellers use to engage, and change city space. In this talk, she will present her work on contemporary urban ‘do-it-yourself’ art and intervention practices, looking at the intersection of technology, ecology and biopolitics.

 

 

Continue reading… Biotechnical Ecologies: Lively Participation in the Contemporary City

What’s on TV? Mon. April 7th, 2014
4:30 pm-5:30 pm

What are we watching when we watch television? What are the conditions of possibility — economic, technical, and aesthetic — that have changed the medium in the 21st century? Provocative questions, answers for which are constantly re-shaped by the interrelated dynamics of audience, advertising revenue, and technology. Nicholas Brown — professor of English at the University of Illinois, Chicago — discusses how contemporary distribution technologies and viewing habits have radically altered the impact that television has upon our culture and economy.

Professor Brown is a 2014 Baker-Nord Scholar-in-Residence.

 

 

 

Continue reading… What’s on TV?

Poetry in the Museum: The Nature of Nature Sun. April 6th, 2014
1:30 pm-3:00 pm

A Baker-Nord Cosponsored Event
In a thought-provoking afternoon at the Cleveland Museum of Natural History, a panel of nationally recognized poets will address the “Nature of Nature”. Before the discussion/ reading, the guest poets will announce the winners of the 2014 Poetry in the Museum contest, who will read their winning poems. Support provided by the Helen Buchman Sharnoff Endowed Fund for Poetry at Case Western Reserve University, as well as by the CWRU Office of Diversity.

 

 

 

 

About the speakers
David Hassler

David Hassler is an award-winning author and poet and director of the Wick Poetry Center at Kent State University.

Continue reading… Poetry in the Museum: The Nature of Nature

“Interpreting Capitalism” Film Series: INSIDE JOB Thu. April 3rd, 2014
1:00 pm-1:00 pm

2010 Oscar Winner for Best Documentary, “Inside Job” provides a comprehensive analysis of the global financial crisis of 2008, which at a cost over $20 trillion, caused millions of people to lose their jobs and homes in the worst recession since the Great Depression, and nearly resulted in a global financial collapse. Through exhaustive research and extensive interviews with key financial insiders, politicians, journalists, and academics, the film traces the rise of a rogue industry that has corrupted politics, regulation, and academia. Introduced by Professor Robert Strassfeld, CWRU Law School faculty.

 

 

 

Continue reading… “Interpreting Capitalism” Film Series: INSIDE JOB

Return to the River: Interdisciplinary Perspectives on Rivers in World Literature Wed. April 2nd, 2014
4:15 pm-5:15 pm

A Baker-Nord Cosponsored Event
This meeting of the Interdisciplinary World Literature Colloquium will reprise and expand the topic of Charles Burroughs’s January 2014 lecture on rivers in world literature. Discussion will focus on poems and prose in Greek, Latin, French, English, and Italian as well as on selected artworks. Presenters will include Florin Berindeanu, Charles Burroughs, Sarah Gridley, Takao Hagiwara, and Timothy Wutrich.

For any questions, please contact Professor Timothy Wutrich at (trw14@cwru.edu) or or 216-368-6026.

Continue reading… Return to the River: Interdisciplinary Perspectives on Rivers in World Literature

Rose Wohlgemuth Weisman Women’s Voices Lecture: A Conversation with Jane Smiley Mon. March 31st, 2014
4:30 pm-5:30 pm

This event features a conversation with Pulitzer Prize-winning novelist and essayist Jane Smiley. Her novels include “A Thousand Acres”, “Moo”,”The All True Travels and Adventures of Lidie Newton”, “Horse Heaven” and “Private Life”. She has contributed to a wide range of magazines and newspapers, including The New Yorker, Elle, Outside, The New York Times, Harper’s, The American Prospect, Practical Horseman, The Guardian, The Nation, Real Simple, and Playboy. Her non-fiction work includes “Thirteen Ways of Looking at the Novel” and “The Man Who Invented the Computer”, along with a four-volume horse series for young adults.

 

Continue reading… Rose Wohlgemuth Weisman Women’s Voices Lecture: A Conversation with Jane Smiley

Public Libraries in the Digital Age Thu. March 27th, 2014
4:30 pm-5:30 pm

Sari Feldman — for the past ten years the Executive Director of Cuyahoga County Public Library (CCPL) — will discuss both how digital technologies are impacting American public libraries and how budget & demographic shifts are creating challenges for these libraries that are busier and more relevant than ever. The CCPL network has 28 branches and serves 47 communities. Feldman is also President of the Board of Cuyahoga Arts and Culture, a political subdivision of the State of Ohio, and one of the largest local public funders of arts and culture in the nation.

 

 

Continue reading… Public Libraries in the Digital Age

Creating a Digital Database on High-altitude Human Biology Wed. March 19th, 2014
1:00 pm-1:00 pm

A Freedman Fellows Presentation
Kelvin Smith Library will host a presentation by 2013 Freedman Fellow, Dr. Cynthia Beall (Distinguished University Professor, Anthropology). Dr. Beall will discuss the challenges and solutions related to her research, and how they were addressed by the Freedman Fellows Program and its corresponding support.

 

 

 

 

 

About the speakers
Cynthia Beall

Dr. Beall’s research is focused on the adaptation of indigenous highlanders (Andean, Tibetan and East African) to the low levels of oxygen where they live at altitudes above 10,000 feet.

Continue reading… Creating a Digital Database on High-altitude Human Biology

Speech, Gesture, Bodily Stance, Graphics, Music, and Media: Studying Multimodal Communication in a Massive Dataset Tue. March 18th, 2014
4:30 pm-5:30 pm

A Baker-Nord Faculty Work-in-Progress
Human communication is multimodal, involving language, co-speech gesture, interpersonal interaction, audiovisual components, media, and technology. Our views of traditional texts have only just begun to include examples of multimodal communication. Professor Turner’s talk will look at theoretical and empirical aspects of computer-assisted research on a massive multimodal corpus of human language and communication.

 

 

 

 

About the speaker
Mark Turner

Mark Turner is Institute Professor and Professor of Cognitive Science at Case Western Reserve University. He is Founding Director of the Cognitive Science Network;

Continue reading… Speech, Gesture, Bodily Stance, Graphics, Music, and Media: Studying Multimodal Communication in a Massive Dataset

“An End to the Neglect of the Problems of the Negro Woman!”: Black Women Communists of the Old Left and Critical Perspectives on Global Capitalism Thu. March 6th, 2014
4:30 pm-5:30 pm

Dr. McDuffie, Associate Professor in the Departments of African American Studies and History at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, examines the ways black women in the US Communist Party (CPUSA) of the Old Left period (1919-1956) forged a ground-breaking radical black feminist praxis that challenged orthodox Marxist framings of capitalism through centering race and gender to their political thought and activism. Given that women of color remain at the bottom of contemporary global social hierarchies, the experiences of Old Left black women radicals provide important lessons for diagnosing current social injustices and for reimagining and building new societies locally and globally.

Continue reading… “An End to the Neglect of the Problems of the Negro Woman!”: Black Women Communists of the Old Left and Critical Perspectives on Global Capitalism

What Happiness Is Wed. March 5th, 2014
4:30 pm-5:30 pm

H. Friedl is an acclaimed film director whose documentaries are regularly shown on Austrian public tv. He was granted permission to accompany a team of government agents as they travelled to the remotest hamlets in the Himalayas. What makes our lives worth living? The official results of this survey reporting on Bhutan’s GNH (gross national happiness) can be found online. The unofficial results in Friedl’s extraordinary documentary form a mosaic of intimate portraits and glimpses into the soul of a people. To one Bhutanese happiness is to be born as a human and not as an ant or a pig.

Continue reading… What Happiness Is

Why Does the World Exist? An Existential Detective Story: A Book Discussion Mon. March 3rd, 2014
1:00 pm-1:00 pm

Why Does the World Exist? An Existential Detective Story by Jim Holt (Liveright 2012) takes up the history and contemporary thinking about what is arguably the most profound question of all in physics and its philosophy. Thompson will lead a discussion of Holt’s accessible, thought-provoking, occasionally funny, and quite well-written explication of this very difficult problem. An informal lunch will be provided.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

About the speaker
Frank Thompson

Frank Thompson is a social scientist (Ph.D.,

Continue reading… Why Does the World Exist? An Existential Detective Story: A Book Discussion

Morally Arbitrary Economic Advantage Thu. February 27th, 2014
4:30 pm-5:30 pm

In this lecture, Frank Thompson, Lecturer and Research Investigator at the University of Michigan, will offer an introductory analysis of the notion of morally arbitrary advantage, focusing on morally arbitrary economic advantage (and disadvantage). This analysis is developed in the framework of the canonical general competitive equilibrium model of neoclassical economic theory. The main conclusion, demonstrated conceptually and empirically, is that different people possessing indistinguishable levels of “human capital” will receive different (often astonishingly so) returns for equally industriously using their human capital, i.e., working. The explanation for this is differential access to technology and (non-human) capital.

Professor Thompson is a 2014 Baker-Nord Scholar-in-Residence.

Continue reading… Morally Arbitrary Economic Advantage

Monty Python and Philosophy Wed. February 26th, 2014
1:00 pm-1:00 pm

Thompson disagrees that “Philosophy [is] on the whole no laughing matter.” — W.V.O. Quine, Quiddities. To formally register his disagreement, Thompson will lead a fun discussion on the oeuvres of Monty Python’s Flying Circus, e.g., “Dead Parrot” (Episode 8), “Argument Clinic” (Episode 29), and their movie “The Meaning of Life”, along with selections from Hardcastle and Reich’s (2006) “Monty Python and Philosophy: Nudge Nudge, Think Think”. An informal lunch will be provided.

 

 

 

 

About the speaker
Frank Thompson

Frank Thompson is a social scientist (Ph.D.,

Continue reading… Monty Python and Philosophy

Cold Case?: Postcolonial Philosophy in France Wed. February 26th, 2014
5:30 pm-6:30 pm

A Humanities Related Event
When postcolonial studies arose in the English-speaking world, India was the paradigm case. But what does postcolonial mean in the French-speaking world, whose primary case is Algeria? After the 2005 riots, the problems in the former French colonies look like a cold case, despite the recent birth of postcolonial studies in France. At first, this work was done by historians and sociologists. But what about the philosophical field, where subjectivation is an important as objectivity? Even if they accept the work of American or British thinkers, French philosophers are not actually interested in this kind of research.

Continue reading… Cold Case?: Postcolonial Philosophy in France

Neither Here Nor There: A translation workshop on French philosophy from the Caribbean Tue. February 25th, 2014
4:30 pm-5:30 pm

A Humanities Related Event
Faculty and students are invited to join Dr. Seloua Luste Boublina in discussing texts that straddle cultural, linguistic, psychological, and even musical genres by philosophers Frantz Fanon and Lewis Gordon.

 

About the speaker
Seloua Luste Boublina

Seloua Luste Boulbina holds Ph.D.’s in Political Science and Philosophy from Universite de Paris. A specialist in Tocqueville, Mill, and Caribbean philosophy, she is Program Director at the College International de Philosophie in Paris. Her publications include “Singe De Kafka (Kafka’s Monkey)” and special issues of “Rue Descartes” on topics related to postcolonial studies and migration.

Continue reading… Neither Here Nor There: A translation workshop on French philosophy from the Caribbean

Slave Flight, Slave Torture, and the State: Nineteenth-Century French Guiana Mon. February 24th, 2014
1:00 pm-1:00 pm

A Humanities Related Event
Miranda Spieler is an historian of France and the French overseas empire whose work explores the relationship between law and violence. She received her AB in History and Literature from Harvard College and her Ph.D. in History from Columbia University. After completing her doctorate in 2005, she joined the History Department at the University of Arizona, where she became an Associate Professor in 2011. Her book, “Empire and Underworld: Captivity in French Guiana” (Harvard 2012), was awarded the J. Russell Major Prize and the Geroge L. Mosse Prize from the American Historical Association in 2013.

Continue reading… Slave Flight, Slave Torture, and the State: Nineteenth-Century French Guiana

A Deeper, Older O: The Oral (Sex) Tradition (in Poetry) Thu. February 20th, 2014
4:30 pm-5:30 pm

A Baker-Nord Cosponsored Event
A part of the Baker Nord Poetics Working-Group’s Spring 2014 programming, poet Jennifer Moxley will lead a discussion of her essay “A Deeper, Older O: The Oral (Sex) Tradition (in Poetry).”

 

About the speaker
Jennifer Moxley

Jennifer Moxley (b. 1964) studied literature and writing at UC San Diego and the University of Rhode Island and received her M.F.A. from Brown University in 1994. She is the author of five books of poetry, most recently Clampdown (Flood 2009), a book of essays, and a memoir.

Continue reading… A Deeper, Older O: The Oral (Sex) Tradition (in Poetry)

Immigration, Inc. Thu. February 20th, 2014
4:30 pm-5:30 pm

Journalist & author Jeffrey Kaye discusses the economic forces that promote and encourage immigration. The public in the U.S. and other industrialized countries tend to view the politically-charged topic through a legal lens, often seeing migration as a matter of personal choice. Kaye examines the policies of businesses and governments in both rich and poor nations to show how globalization and economic policies have helped create patterns of international migration.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

About the speaker
Jeffrey Kaye

Jeffrey Kaye is a freelance journalist,

Continue reading… Immigration, Inc.

From the Tigris to the Tiber: A Case of Babylonian ‘Astro-Medicine’ in Pliny the Elder Wed. February 19th, 2014
1:00 pm-1:00 pm

A Baker-Nord Cosponsored Event
This talk will present and compare two texts — a puzzling late Babylonian Kalendertext written on a cuneiform tablet in Uruk by a scholar named Iqisa (late fourth century BCE), and a passage from the Natural History of Pliny the Elder (first century CE) concerning fever therapies. While at a first glance these two testimonies seem to have nothing in common, a closer examination of them reveals that Pliny was commenting on the specific tradition of pairing animal products with calendric/zodiac information as found in Iqisa’s text, and thus each is useful for the interpretation of the other.

Continue reading… From the Tigris to the Tiber: A Case of Babylonian ‘Astro-Medicine’ in Pliny the Elder

Mountain Visions: Modernism and Dystopia in the Alps Wed. February 19th, 2014
4:30 pm-1:00 pm

A Baker-Nord Cosponsored Event
Talk 1: “Modernist Motion on the Mountainside: Alpine Skiing and Central European Culture, 1900-39 Andrew Denning, History, University of British Columbia

When does a pastime become an art form? When skiers arrived in the Alps around 1880, locals mocked them as bourgeois “plank hoppers.” By the turn of the twentieth century, however, Alpine skiing had become a cultural phenomenon. Skiers experienced the grandeur of nature and the rush of speed simultaneously, transforming leisure into art. As skiers synthesized Romanticism and modernism on Alpine slopes, they offered a vision of their sport as a cure for modern ills and,

Continue reading… Mountain Visions: Modernism and Dystopia in the Alps

“Interpreting Capitalism” Film Series: THE LAST TRAIN HOME Thu. February 13th, 2014
1:00 pm-1:00 pm

Every spring, China’s cities are plunged into chaos as 130 million migrant workers journey to their home villages for the New Year’s holiday: an epic spectacle that reveals a country tragically caught between its rural past and industrial future. In this award-winning film, Chinese-Canadian filmmaker Lixin Fan travels with one couple who have embarked on this annual trek for almost two decades. Emotionally engaging and starkly beautiful, Last Train Home sheds light on the human cost of China’s ascendance as an economic superpower. Introduced by Wendy Fu, CWRU Assistant Professor of History.

Continue reading… “Interpreting Capitalism” Film Series: THE LAST TRAIN HOME

The Making of Albert Camus’ “The Stranger” Mon. February 10th, 2014
4:30 pm-5:30 pm

The Stranger was published in 1942, in the depths of the Nazi Occupation, by a young unemployed journalist from Algeria who would normally never have had a hearing in Paris. In her lecture, Alice Kaplan, John M. Musser Professor of French at Yale University, will explore the making of this phenomenal literary success. That this strange book should become the best known French novel in the United States and still the most widely taught, that it changed the whole direction of the novel, here and in France… is, in literary terms, a miracle. This lecture, in memory of Walter A.

Continue reading… The Making of Albert Camus’ “The Stranger”

Alterity Revisited: Recent Projects Thu. February 6th, 2014
4:30 pm-5:30 pm

A Baker-Nord Digital Humanities Event
Jose Carlos Teixeira — the Champney Family Professor of Art, CWRU & Cleveland Institute of Art — will present his recent interdisciplinary and multi-media-based research explorations. His work investigates and expands on notions of identity, otherness, language, boundary, exile and displacement. Through strategies of participation, his pieces address specific issues related to locational identity, global diaspora, and the limits (or overlapping) of personal/social, physical/mental, and political territories. An artist with a distinguished international reputation, Professor Teixeira focuses mainly on participatory and collaborative events, therefore incorporating multiple voices and subjects into his audiovisual projects.

Continue reading… Alterity Revisited: Recent Projects

The Crisis of Journalism and the Conversion of the United States from a Democracy to a Dollarocracy Mon. January 27th, 2014
4:30 pm-5:30 pm

The United States is no longer a “functional democracy,” according to Jimmy Carter. The wealthy dominate politics and the rest of the population are sitting in the bleachers for a game at which they’re mere spectators. This talk examines the crucial role that the collapse of journalism has played in accelerating and making permanent the state of “Dollarocracy.” McChesney also discusses how American history – plus the experience of other democratic nations – suggests there are workable policy solutions to make possible a rich, diverse, uncensored, and competitive free press in the digital era.

 

 

Continue reading… The Crisis of Journalism and the Conversion of the United States from a Democracy to a Dollarocracy

The Speaking River: Voices In and From the Urban Landscape Thu. January 23rd, 2014
4:30 pm-5:30 pm

A Baker-Nord Cosponsor Event
Rivers are often background, especially within city limits. In modern cities, formerly obstreperous rivers have been channeled and generally domesticated by embankments and weirs, and condemned to carry tourist craft and little else. However, in many cities, the river is the most ancient and persistent “natural” element, qualifying often as a symbol — not least in art and poetry — of a city that it preceded and will probably outlive. It may even receive a voice, and become a kind of character in the drama of that unfolds around it. With the professionalization of landscape design in the 19th century,

Continue reading… The Speaking River: Voices In and From the Urban Landscape

Issues in 20th and 21st Century Art: Lize Mogel Wed. January 22nd, 2014
5:00 pm-6:00 pm

A Humanities Related Event
Lize Mogel is an interdisciplinary artist who works with the interstices between art and cultural geography. She has created and disseminated counter-cartography maps and mapping that produce new understandings of social and political issues. Her work connects the real history and collective imaginary about specific places to larger narratives of global economies. She has mapped public parks in Los Angeles; future territorial disputes in the Arctic; and wastewater economies in New York City. She is co-editor of the book/map collection “An Atlas of Radical Cartography,” a project that significantly influenced the conversation and production around mapping and activism.

Continue reading… Issues in 20th and 21st Century Art: Lize Mogel

Lee Daniels’ The Butler: Film Screening and Discussion Tue. January 21st, 2014
1:00 pm-1:00 pm

A Baker-Nord Cosponsored Event
A 2013 American historical fiction drama film directed by Lee Daniels is loosely inspired by the real-life of Eugene Allen, an African-American who eyewitnesses notable events of the 20th century during his 34-year tenure serving as a White House butler to eight presidents over three decades. The film traces the dramatic changes that swept American society during this time, from the civil rights movement to Vietnam and beyond, and how those changes affected this man’s life and family. A discussion will follow the screening. This event, part of the 2014 Martin Luther King Week programming,

Continue reading… Lee Daniels’ The Butler: Film Screening and Discussion

Euripides’s Hecuba: A Political Interpretation Fri. January 17th, 2014
1:00 pm-1:00 pm

A Baker-Nord Cosponsored Event
Much of the criticism on Euripides’s Hecuba is focused on the character of Hecuba as victimized mother who rightfully avenges her son’s death and those who argue for Hecuba’s moral deterioration over the course of the plays’ two main movements, sacrifice and revenge. This talk departs in a new direction by analyzing how the historical and political background informs the key themes of the protection due prisoners of war and the treatment of the vanquished. Viewed against the Athenian empire’s policies in the 420s BCE, Hecuba focuses on the obligations of the strong toward the weak and of masters towards slaves,

Continue reading… Euripides’s Hecuba: A Political Interpretation

Pearl Harbor: Sneak Attack or Provocation? Thu. December 5th, 2013
4:15 pm-1:00 pm

A Humanities-Related Event
In America the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor has been interpreted as a cowardly sneak attack by an evil enemy on an innocent America. But what if FDR provoked, even unnecessarily, Japan’s attack on Pearl Harbor? If this were so, our understanding of the history of World War II and its consequences up until September 11, 2001 and beyond would have to change. Dr. Hagiwara’s presentation, scheduled just days before Pearl Harbor Day, is meant to start further discussions on Pearl Harbor and other related issues such as Japan’s alleged atrocities in Asia before and during World War II,

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Hired Education: Capitalism and the Academic Community Wed. November 20th, 2013
4:30 pm-5:30 pm

Historian Ellen Schrecker presents a perspective on how and why the leaders of American universities embraced the corporate mindset that had come to dominate the neoliberal political climate of the late 20th century. She examines the current state of the academy in which universities have become engines of economic growth, along with students viewed as customers, faculties engaged as capsulized employees, and successful researchers considered entrepreneurs. The lecture will discuss implications of this profound shift in the institutional missions of American colleges and universities.

 

 

 

 

 

Continue reading… Hired Education: Capitalism and the Academic Community

Politics in Early Eighteenth-Century Britian: Why Handel was Fired and Other Stories Mon. November 18th, 2013
7:30 pm-8:30 pm

A Baker-Nord Cosponsored Event
When Handel arrived in London, he was in the employ of the Elector of Hanover, Georg Ludwig, who was heir to the throne of Great Britain. The current monarch Queen Anne welcomed Handel at court, and the composer quickly began composing works for ceremonial court occasions. In the meantime, Lord Burlington (who is thought to have supported the claims to the throne of “James III”, the nephew of Queen Anne who was living in exile in France) welcomed Handel into his artistic circle. How did these different political pulls on Handel’s time affect his career,

Continue reading… Politics in Early Eighteenth-Century Britian: Why Handel was Fired and Other Stories

From Russia to Cleveland: Politics, Sports & the LGBT Experience Fri. November 15th, 2013
12:30 pm-1:00 pm

Join the Panel Discussion looking a the Russia/Winter Olympics situation as it relates to politics and the LGBT community. Learn about the GG (Gay Games 2014) held in Cleveland, and explore how global thinking at a local level has been incorporated into preparing to host athletes and visitors from all over the country and the world.

This event is part of CWRU’s International Education Week. More information can be found at case.edu/international/IEW.

Continue reading… From Russia to Cleveland: Politics, Sports & the LGBT Experience

The Falling Rate of Profit: Karl Marx’s Struggle to Prove the Demise of Capitalism Thu. November 14th, 2013
4:30 pm-5:30 pm

Although never explicitly mentioned in Vol. 1 of Capital, the idea of a falling rate of profit was central to Karl Marx’s understanding of both the workings of capitalism and to what he expected to be its ultimate demise. Jonathan Sperber–Curator Professor of History at the University of Missouri–will explain Marx’s concept of the falling rate of profit and the difficulties he encountered with definitively proving what he knew intuitively to be the case. This elucidation of a central element of Marx’s economics will help to place his ideas both in the history of economic thought but also in the history of the capitalist economic system.

Continue reading… The Falling Rate of Profit: Karl Marx’s Struggle to Prove the Demise of Capitalism

Emerging Methodologies: An Introduction to the Field of Digital Humanities Tue. November 12th, 2013
1:00 pm-1:00 pm

 

 
A Baker-Nord Digital Humanities Event
 

Allison Schifani, Baker-Nord Center Postdoctoral Scholar in the Digital Humanities, presents an informal introduction to the field. This talk will provide a broad overview of emerging methodologies for research and teaching across the humanities. In addition to offering new ways to help answer central research questions and alternative means to explore texts, digital technologies can aid in collaboration between scholars and institutions, augment and distribute scholarly writing and enliven classroom discussions and scholarly debate. Digital Humanities practitioners use a broad variety of tools to deepen access to the objects of their study and sharpen the analysis they offer in their work.

Continue reading… Emerging Methodologies: An Introduction to the Field of Digital Humanities

Interpreting Capitalism Film Series: Garbage Dreams Mon. November 11th, 2013
1:00 pm-1:00 pm

On the outskirts of Cairo lies the world’s largest garbage village, home to 60,000 Zaballeen–Arabic for garbage people. The Zaballeen have survived for centuries by recycling Cairo waste. Following the international trend to privatize services, however, Cairo sold contracts to corporations to pick up the city’s garbage. As these foreign companies came in and began carting garbage to nearby landfills, the Zaballeen watched their way of life disappearing. This extraordinary film documents–with often surprising humor–the daily struggles, frustrations, and friendship of three teenage boys born into the Zaballeen trash trade.

Continue reading… Interpreting Capitalism Film Series: Garbage Dreams

American Glamour: Modern Architecture, Marketing, and Popular Culture in the 1950s Thu. November 7th, 2013
1:00 pm-1:00 pm

Alice T. Friedman–the Grace Slack McNeil Professor of American Art at Wellesley College–will examine key examples of Mid-century Modern architecture in the United States, focusing on the ways in which buildings and interiors came to reflect the forms, narrative structures, and emotional appeal of mass-market media such as advertising, fashion photography, film and television. Driven by the tastes and habits of middle-class clients, and by the efforts of young architects to accommodate and interpret new ideas about modern life, these changes had far-reaching consequences both for architecture and design in the 20th century and for the critical categories by which they are evaluated.

Continue reading… American Glamour: Modern Architecture, Marketing, and Popular Culture in the 1950s

An Afternoon with Nikki Giovanni Mon. October 28th, 2013
4:30 pm-5:30 pm

Join The Baker-Nord Center and our guest, Nikki Giovanni, as she reads and discusses her works. Many of Giovanni’s books have received honors and awards. Her autobiography, Gemini, was a finalist for the National Book Award; Love Poems, Blues: For All the Changes, Quilting the Black-Eyed Pea, Acolytes, and Hip Hop Speaks to Children were all honored with NAACP Image Awards. Blues: For All the Changes reached #4 on the Los Angeles Times Bestseller list, a rare achievement for a book of poems.

Continue reading… An Afternoon with Nikki Giovanni

Improvisation and Transgression: Musicians of the Harem Thu. October 24th, 2013
4:30 pm-5:30 pm

The Western perception of the harem, or women’s quarters, and assumptions about the residents and their lifestyle remains a persistent Orientalist fantasy. Professor Nielson–the Anisfield-Wolf SAGES Fellow–will share her research regarding how, even in those cultures with seemingly inflexible rules regarding gender segregation, musicians had the unique ability to negotiate both physical and social boundaries surrounding the harem. Through a comparison of different cultural contexts, she will discuss historical uses for harem musicians as well as their frequent appearance in Orientalist representations of the harem.

 

 

 

 

 

Continue reading… Improvisation and Transgression: Musicians of the Harem

The Historical and the Metaphysical in George Oppens’ “Route” Fri. October 18th, 2013
1:00 pm-3:30 pm

Robert Baker’s fields of interest are modern poetry from the romantic period through the present, twentieth-century and contemporary literature, and the relationships among literature, philosophy, and religion. His first book, “The Extravagant: Crossings of Modern Poetry and Modern Philosophy,” includes detailed discussions of Kant, Wordsworth, Lyotard, Rimbaud, Nietzsche, Bataille, Kierkegaard, Dickinson, Mallarme, and Derrida. His second book, “In the Dark Again in Wonder: The Poetry of Rene Char and George Oppen”, is a study of two late modernist poets, both of whom were fully engaged in the political upheavals of the 1930s and 1940s.

Continue reading… The Historical and the Metaphysical in George Oppens’ “Route”

History in Fiction: Reading the Novels of Nobel Laureate Mo Yan Thu. October 17th, 2013
4:30 pm-1:00 pm

Controversies about Chinese writer Mo Yan have been heated since last October, when the Swedish Academy announced him to be the winner of the Nobel Prize in Literature for his work “with hallucinatory realism merging folk tales, history and the contemporary.” The most recent debate was aroused by German Sinologist Wolfgang Kubin, who commented at a May conference in Hong Kong: “I cannot come to a thorough understanding of post-1911 Chinese history through his fiction.” In response to the criticism, this lecture investigates Mo Yan’s fictional historiography by focusing on four of his thirteen novels, namely “Red Sorghum” (1987), “Big Breasts and Wide Hips”

Continue reading… History in Fiction: Reading the Novels of Nobel Laureate Mo Yan

Interpreting Capitalism Film Series: The Queen of Versailles Mon. October 14th, 2013
1:00 pm-1:00 pm

A whimsical documentary that offers an off-center view of a billionaire couple as they begin construction on a mansion inspired by the French palace of Versailles. The film chronicles how their empire–fueled by the real estate bubble and cheap money–falters due to the economic crisis. Introduced by Robert Spadoni, Associate Professor of English, CWRU.

Continue reading… Interpreting Capitalism Film Series: The Queen of Versailles

Rarely Seen Gems of the Japanese Cinema (with English subtitles): Growing Up (Takekurabe, 1955) Sat. October 12th, 2013
1:00 pm-1:00 pm

This film was directed by Heinosuke Gosho and is part of a series curated by Linda C. Ehrlich and John Ewing in celebration of the reopening of the Japanese and Korean Art Galleries at the Cleveland Museum of Art.

 

Cosponsored with:
The Japan Foundation, New York, CWRU College of Arts and Sciences Dean’s Office, CWRU Department of Modern Languages and Literatures

Continue reading… Rarely Seen Gems of the Japanese Cinema (with English subtitles): Growing Up (Takekurabe, 1955)

Rarely Seen Gems of the Japanese Cinema (with English subtitles): Humanity and Paper Balloons (Ninjo kami fusen, 1937) Sat. October 5th, 2013
1:00 am-1:00 am

This film was directed by Sadao Yamanaka and is part of a series curated by Linda C. Ehrlich and John Ewing in celebration of the reopening of the Japanese and Korean Art Galleries at the Cleveland Museum of Art.

 

Cosponsored with:
The Japan Foundation, New York, CWRU College of Arts and Sciences Dean’s Office, CWRU Department of Modern Languages and Literatures

Continue reading… Rarely Seen Gems of the Japanese Cinema (with English subtitles): Humanity and Paper Balloons (Ninjo kami fusen, 1937)

Rarely Seen Gems of the Japanese Cinema (with English subtitles): Record of a Tenement Gentleman (Nagaya shinshiroku, 1947) Thu. October 3rd, 2013
6:30 pm-8:30 pm

This film was directed by Yasujiro Ozu and is part of a series curated by Linda C. Ehrlich and John Ewing in celebration of the reopening of the Japanese and Korean Art Galleries at the Cleveland Museum of Art.

 

Cosponsored with:
The Japan Foundation, New York, CWRU College of Arts and Sciences Dean’s Office, CWRU Department of Modern Languages and Literatures

Continue reading… Rarely Seen Gems of the Japanese Cinema (with English subtitles): Record of a Tenement Gentleman (Nagaya shinshiroku, 1947)

High Tech, Low Life Wed. October 2nd, 2013
1:00 pm-1:00 pm

This award-winning documentary follows two of China’s first citizen reporters as they travel through the country, chronicling underreported news and social issues stories. Using laptops, cell phones, and digital cameras to micro-blog the stories and issues shaping contemporary Chinese life, they challenge conventional definitions of journalism and provoke discussion about what freedom of press means in the face of China’s evolving censorship. The film’s director, Stephen Maing, will provide an introduction to the documentary, as well as conduct a question and answer session immediately following the screening.

 

Cosponsored with:
CWRU Asian Studies Program, CWRU Center for Research on Tibet,

Continue reading… High Tech, Low Life

UNIVERSITY CIRCLE: CREATING A SENSE OF PLACE: Film Premier and Panel Discussion Mon. September 30th, 2013
5:30 pm-1:00 pm

The Baker-Nord Center is proud to present the public premier of a new documentary film on the history, public art, and architecture of University Circle. The screening will be followed by a panel discussing “Hidden Stories: National Models” with representation from the Free Clinic, Hessler Street and Magnolia House. The panel discussion will be moderated by Dan Moulthrop, CEO of The City Club of Cleveland.

Project Director and Executive Producer Nina Freedlander Gibans and Videographer and Director Jesse Epstein have involved dozens of participants in telling the stories pertinent to understanding this unique area: Hunter Morrison,

Continue reading… UNIVERSITY CIRCLE: CREATING A SENSE OF PLACE: Film Premier and Panel Discussion

Rarely Seen Gems of the Japanese Cinema (with English subtitles): Miss Oyu (Oyusama, 1951) Sat. September 28th, 2013
1:00 pm-1:00 pm

A Baker-Nord Cosponsored Event
This film was directed by Kenji Mizoguchi and is part of a series curated by Linda C. Ehrlich and John Ewing in celebration of the reopening of the Japanese and Korean Art Galleries at the Cleveland Museum of Art.

Cosponsored with:
The Japan Foundation, New York, CWRU College of Arts and Sciences Dean’s Office, CWRU Department of Modern Languages and Literatures

Continue reading… Rarely Seen Gems of the Japanese Cinema (with English subtitles): Miss Oyu (Oyusama, 1951)

Regional Poets on Poetry: A general discussion of selected poems Fri. September 27th, 2013
1:00 pm-1:00 pm

Award-winning regional poets Frank Giampietro, David Young, and Joy Katz will discuss trends in contemporary poetry by examining representative texts in this panel presentation that kicks off this Fall’s Baker-Nord Poetics Working Group programming. Poet and Assistant Professor of English Sarah Gridley will serve as moderator.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

About the speakers
Frank Giampietro

Frank Giampietro is Interim Director of the Cleveland State University Poetry Center. He is the author of Begin Anywhere.

Continue reading… Regional Poets on Poetry: A general discussion of selected poems

An Inner History of Collecting Chinese Painting for Cleveland: Sherman E. Lee and Walter Hochstadter Thu. September 26th, 2013
4:30 pm-5:30 pm

A Baker-Nord Center Faculty Work-in-Progress
Sherman E. Lee (1918-2008), Cleveland Museum of Art director and curator of “Oriental” art, emerged as one of the most successful institutional collectors of Chinese painting in the 1950s and 1960s. During those postwar decades, Lee acquired over seventy-five paintings through a small network of private collectors and dealers, including the German expatriate Walter Hochstadter (1914-2007), from whom a majority of his early acquisitions flowed. Art historian Noelle Giuffrida investigates Lee’s complex relationship with Hochstadter to reveal an important chapter of the inner history of Chinese painting collecting in postwar America.

 

Continue reading… An Inner History of Collecting Chinese Painting for Cleveland: Sherman E. Lee and Walter Hochstadter

Scholarly Publishing Today Tue. September 24th, 2013
12:30 pm-1:30 pm

Scholars at every stage, from graduate school to retirement, face an overwhelming array of choices concerning publication of their scholarship. The landscape of research, teaching, and publishing continues to change, and part of a successful career as a scholar involves understanding the most rational choices for publishing and disseminating ones work. Mary Francis, Executive Editor, Music and Cinema Studies for University of California Press, will discuss the publishing process, from start to finish, and take questions about changes in academic publishing today.

 

About the speaker
Mary Francis

Mary C. Francis,

Continue reading… Scholarly Publishing Today

The Yellow Birds: A Reading and Discussion with Kevin Powers Wed. September 11th, 2013
4:30 pm-5:30 pm

A Baker-Nord Center Cosponsored Event
Author Kevin Powers will read from and discuss The Yellow Birds, winner of the 2013 Anisfield-Wolf Book Award for fiction. The Yellow Birds focuses on the last weeks of friendship between 18-year-old Private Daniel Murphy and 21-year-old Private John Bartle, who makes a rash promise to Mrs. Murphy to bring her son home safely from Iraq. Powers enlisted at the age of 17 and served as a machine gunner in Iraq in 2004 and 2005.

 

 

 

 

Continue reading… The Yellow Birds: A Reading and Discussion with Kevin Powers


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