In addition to organizing its own programming, the Baker-Nord Center for the Humanities supports and promotes humanities programming available throughout the Case Western Reserve University and Greater Cleveland community.  Below is the listing of upcoming humanities-related programming.

APRIL


Balm in Gilead: Memory, Mourning, and Healing In African American Autobiography
Wednesday, April 11
4:30 pm 
Tinkham Veale University Center, Ballroom C, 11038 Bellflower Road, Cleveland, OH  44106
Albert J. Raboteau is the Henry W. Putnam Professor of Religion Emeritus at Princeton University and is a specialist in American religious history. His research and teaching have focused on American Catholic history, African-American religious movements and currently he is working on the place of beauty in the history of Eastern and Western Christian Spirituality. He has written Slave Religion: The ‘Invisible Institution’ in the Antebellum South, A Fire in the Bones: Reflections on African-American Religious History, African-American Religion: Interpretative Essay in History, ed. with Timothy Fulop, A Sorrowful Joy and an updated 25th anniversary edition of Slave Religion, and, co-edited with Richard Alba and Josh DeWind, Immigration and Religion in America: Comparative and Historical Perspectives, and, most recently, American Prophets: Seven Religious Radicals & Their Struggle for Social and Political Justice (2016, Princeton University Press). He was the first recipient of the J.W.C. Pennington Award from the University of Heidelberg and last delivered the Stone Lectures at Princeton Theological Seminary in 2012.

“There is a way out of the evasion and willed amnesia of our racial trauma – stories, recalling them to memory. African American autobiography offers one such way as a telling of memories, an expression of mourning, and….a method of healing wounds, personal and social, inflicted by racism.”

This event is sponsored by the CWRU Department of Religious Studies and is free and open to the public.

 

2018 Cleveland Humanities Festival: HEALTH
Film Screening and Discussion:
They Shall Not Persish: The Story of Near East Relief
Friday, April 13
6:30 pm
Tinkham Veale University Center Ballroom A, 11038 Bellflower Road, Cleveland, OH 44106
This documentary details the unprecedented humanitarian efforts of thousands of Americans who saved a generation of orphans and refugees during the collapse of the Ottoman Empire and in the aftermath of the crisis that came to be known as the Armenian Genocide. The screening will be followed by a discussion led by Kenneth Ledford, Associate Professor in the Department of History.

This event is co-sponsored by the Armenian Cultural Organization and the Baker-Nord Center for the Humanities and is free and open to the public.

Registration recommended.

 

Rereading the Technomasculine Narrative: Performing Identity Through Video Games in Underground Hip Hop
Thursday, April 19
4:30 pm
Clark Hall Room 206, 11130 Bellflower Road, Cleveland, OH 44106
Video games are ubiquitous in American culture today, and their sounds have worked their way into the popular soundscape over the past half-century. In this lecture, Musicology PhD Candidate Kate Rogers examines how current underground hip hop musicians use game sounds and topics as platforms for exploring identity, questioning stereotypes of race and gender, and advocating for social justice.

This event is sponsored by the Baker-Nord Center for the Humanities and is free and open to the public.

Registration recommended.

 

2018 Joseph and Violet Magyar Lecture:
A Specter Haunting Europe: The Myth of Judeo-Bolshevism in Hungary and Eastern Europe
Tuesday, April 24
4:30 pm
Clark Hall Room 309, 11130 Bellflower Road, Cleveland, OH 44106
For much of the twentieth century, Europe was haunted by a threat of its own imagining: Judeo-Bolshevism. This myth—that Communism was a Jewish plot to destroy the nations of Europe—was a paranoid fantasy. And yet fears of a Jewish Bolshevik conspiracy took hold during the Russian Revolution and spread across Europe. In this talk, Professor Hanebrink, Associate Professor of History at Rutgers, asks why the myth of Judeo-Bolshevism endured for so long in Hungary and Eastern Europe and what legacy this idea has left for contemporary politics in the region.

This event is sponsored by the Baker-Nord Center for the Humanities and is free and open to the public.

Registration recommended.