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Past Events

Event Date Summary
2018 Joseph and Violet Magyar Lecture in Hungarian Studies – A Specter Haunting Europe: The Myth of Judeo-Bolshevism in Hungary and Eastern Europe Tue. April 24th, 2018
5:00 pm-6:00 pm

For much of the twentieth century, Europe was haunted by a threat of its own imagining: Judeo-Bolshevism. This myth—that Communism was a Jewish plot to destroy the nations of Europe—was a paranoid fantasy. And yet fears of a Jewish Bolshevik conspiracy took hold during the Russian Revolution and spread across Europe. In this talk, Professor Hanebrink, Associate Professor of History at Rutgers, asks why the myth of Judeo-Bolshevism endured for so long in Hungary and Eastern Europe and what legacy this idea has left for contemporary politics in the region.

Registration recommended. Registration Button

 

Graduate Student Work-in-Progress – Rereading the Technomasculine Narrative: Performing Identity Through Video Games in Underground Hip Hop Thu. April 19th, 2018
4:30 pm-5:30 pm

Video games are ubiquitous in American culture today, and their sounds have worked their way into the popular soundscape over the past half-century. In this lecture, Musicology PhD Candidate Kate Rogers examines how current underground hip hop musicians use game sounds and topics as platforms for exploring identity, questioning stereotypes of race and gender, and advocating for social justice.

Pre-lecture reception begins at 4:15 pm.

Registration recommended.  Registration Button

Film Screening and Discussion – They Shall Not Perish: The Story of Near East Relief Fri. April 13th, 2018
6:30 pm-8:30 pm

2018 CLEVELAND HUMANITIES FESTIVAL: HEALTH

This documentary details the unprecedented humanitarian efforts of thousands of Americans who saved a generation of orphans and refugees during the collapse of the Ottoman Empire and in the aftermath of the crisis that came to be known as the Armenian Genocide. The screening will be followed by a panel discussion led by Kenneth Ledford, Associate Professor in the Department of History and will include the film’s Executive Producer, Shant Mardirossian.

This event is co-sponsored by the Armenian Cultural Organization and the Near East Foundation.    

Honoring the Story of Care Mon. April 2nd, 2018
4:30 pm-5:30 pm

2018 CLEVELAND HUMANITIES FESTIVAL: HEALTH

In his talk, Craig Irvine, Ph.D., Director of the Master’s Program in Narrative Medicine and founder and Academic Director of the Program in Narrative Medicine at Columbia University, proposes that the care of the sick unfolds in stories. The effective practice of healthcare requires the ability to recognize, absorb, interpret, and act on the stories and plights of others. Narrative Medicine addresses the need of patients and caregivers to voice their experience, to be heard and to be valued, and it acknowledges the power of narrative to change the way care is given and received.

Quacks, Charlatans, and Geniuses: Medicine in Ancient Greece Tue. March 27th, 2018
12:00 pm-1:00 pm

2018 CLEVELAND HUMANITIES FESTIVAL: HEALTH

The Greeks laid the foundation for Western medicine, but much of what we know about their medical practices seems rather unpromising. Did eating a boiled mouse cure infant teething? Why should a doctor consult a patient’s horoscope? What did a surgery competition entail? Why was dissection forbidden? James C. McKeown, Professor of Classics at the University of Wisconsin – Madison and author of A Cabinet of Ancient Medical Curiosities: Strange Tales and Surprising Facts From the Healing Arts of Greece and Rome (2017), introduces us to some of the more curious realities of what happened when Socrates needed a doctor.

Therapeutic Process Using Narrative: A Vulnerable Reading of Shakespeare’s “The Tempest” Mon. March 26th, 2018
4:30 pm-5:30 pm

2018 CLEVELAND HUMANITIES FESTIVAL: HEALTH

Life’s problems are often best approached in companionship with a story that offers guidance, and what guidance that is can vary considerably. The Hamlet in the Hospital project involves small groups performing readers’ theatre and then talking about how the play might be a companion in their work and lives. In this talk, Arthur Frank, Professor Emeritus of Sociology at the University of Calgary, Professor at VID Specialized University, Bergen, Norway, and core faculty at the Center for Narrative Practice in Boston, will discuss how in these discussions,

Symposium – Beyond Empathy: Critical Perspectives on Medicine, Society and Culture Sat. March 24th, 2018
8:30 am-4:00 pm

2018 CLEVELAND HUMANITIES FESTIVAL: HEALTH

This day-long symposium will feature presentations on the vibrant field of medical humanities, addressing a variety of unsettled questions, such as: How can humanistic and social science disciplines take account of one another’s insights for the study of health and medicine? How should these fields best inform clinical practice? And what, ultimately, is medical humanities for? Participants will include faculty and students from the humanities and social sciences, the School of Medicine, and the Cleveland Clinic. The program will include a demonstration in the Cleveland Museum of Art on the critical study of visual arts to train medical students in the skill of clinical observation.

Food Politics in 2018: A Humanities Perspective Fri. March 23rd, 2018
4:30 pm-5:30 pm

2018 CLEVELAND HUMANITIES FESTIVAL : HEALTH

Nestle ImageIn this lecture Marion Nestle, Paulette Goddard Professor, of Nutrition, Food Studies, and Public Health, Emerita, at New York University, discusses the idea that the paradox of today’s globalized food system is that food insecurity or obesity threaten the health and welfare of half the world’s population.  Underlying these problems is an overabundant but inequitably distributed food system in which corporations are forced to expand markets to meet growth targets.   The contradiction between business and public health goals has led to a large and growing movement to promote more healthful,

No Más Bebés: Film and Conversation with Producer/Researcher Virginia Espino Wed. March 21st, 2018
6:00 pm-8:00 pm

2018 CLEVELAND HUMANITIES FESTIVAL: HEALTH

They came to have their babies. They went home sterilized. So begins the incredibly moving tales of the women chronicled in No Más Bebés(No More Babies), a heartbreaking documentary film based on the research of Latinx historian Virginia Espino. This is the story of Mexican immigrant mothers who sued Los Angeles county doctors, the state and the federal government after they were sterilized while giving birth in the 1970s. Led by an intrepid young Chicana lawyer, the mothers faced public exposure and stood up to powerful institutions in the name of justice.

Grant Writing for Humanities Majors Mon. March 19th, 2018
12:00 pm-1:30 pm

career workshop imageThis workshop is part of a series designed to offer Humanities majors the opportunity to improve their professional writing skills. This session will focus on the grant writing skills needed when applying for fellowships, funding and awards.   It will include a presentation and workshop time to review and/or work on documents. Whether you’re starting from scratch or have existing materials, this series aims to give you tools that will enhance the written documents needed for pursing your career. 

This event is co-sponsored by the Career Center and the Writing Resource Center.

Lunch will be provided.

Faculty-Work-in-Progress – Designing Power: The Women of The Fashion Group and the Promotion of Feminist Style During the 1930s and 1940s Tue. March 6th, 2018
4:30 pm-5:30 pm

Rabinovitch-Fox WIPDuring the interwar period, the fashion industry offered women more possibilities to gain positions of power and influence within the business. In 1930, The Fashion Group—an all-female organization of prominent women in the fashion business—was founded as a forum to promote the American fashion industry and women’s role in it. In its activities and publications, the Fashion Group managed to popularize ideas about women’s freedom and contributed to the mainstreaming of feminism in the popular media through the rise of the “American Style” that imagined the modern fashion consumer as economic independent, physically mobile woman seeking both style and comfort. 

Undergraduate Student Event – Humanities@Work: Non-Profits Mon. February 26th, 2018
6:00 pm-7:00 pm

Non-Profit ImageAt this event for undergraduate students, panelists working in the non-profit sector will discuss how studying the humanities influenced their careers and answer questions from the audience. Panelists include:

Alexis Crosby, Career Pathways Coordinator, Open Doors Academy;
Annette Iwamoto, the Strategic Initiatives Manager at Providence House;
Beth Thompson, the Program Director at Milestones Autism Resources; and
Melinda Jackson, Founder and Executive Director of the International Youth Leadership Foundation.

This event is co-sponosred by the Center for Civic Engagement and Learning (CCEL).

Dinner will be provided.  Registration requested.    

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Graduate Student Work-in-Progress – Thinking Like a Virus: Rhetoric, Aesthetics, and AIDS Literature Thu. February 22nd, 2018
4:30 pm-5:30 pm

What does it mean to call a text “AIDS Literature”? What is the effect of applying this label to a text that does not attempt a faithful representation of the AIDS Crisis of the 1980s and 1990s, but instead deploys HIV and AIDS as literary metaphors? By analyzing texts such as the later experiments of William S. Burroughs, the novels of Kathy Acker, and the artwork and memoirs of David Wojnarowicz, English PhD Candidate Michael Chiappini seeks to trouble the prevailing understanding of AIDS literature by refocusing our attention to texts that do not aspire to narrative fidelity to the Crisis,

Job Correspondence Writing for Humanities Majors Mon. February 19th, 2018
9:00 am-10:30 am

career workshop imageThis workshop is part of a series designed to offer Humanities majors the opportunity to improve their professional writing skills. This session will focus on writing job correspondence including cover letters and thank you notes. It will include a presentation and workshop time to review and/or work on documents. Whether you’re starting from scratch or have existing materials, this series aims to give you tools that will enhance the written documents needed for pursing your career. 

This event is co-sponsored by the Career Center and the Writing Resource Center.

Registration requested.

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2018 Baker-Nord Distinguished Faculty Lecture – Thomas Hart Benton, Jackson Pollock, and the Secrets of El Greco Wed. February 7th, 2018
4:30 pm-5:30 pm

Click HERE to view this event.

Many of those who have been skeptical about Jackson Pollock’s work have done a double-take when they’ve encountered Pollock’s early drawings after El Greco, which employ an analytical approach he learned from his first and only teacher, Thomas Hart Benton.  They reveal that Pollock’s mature work was based on a deep understanding of the compositional methods of the old masters.  Interestingly, they also shed light on El Greco’s own working methods, and on the factors that led to the invention of El Greco’s signature artistic style. 

Faculty-Work-in-Progress – Sacred Protests: Politics and Faith after Sexual Abuse Thu. February 1st, 2018
4:30 pm-5:30 pm

Clites WIPIn the wake of Boston, 2002, survivors of Catholic clergy sexual abuse have been empowered to come forward with their stories of suffering. Yet from the ashes of their collective trauma, abuse survivors have built a robust agenda of political and religious reforms. In this lecture, Brian Clites, Instructor in the Department of Religious Studies, takes us on an ethnographic exploration of Catholic abuse survivors’ protests, examining not only the reforms that victims seek but also the conflicting emotions that they feel towards their church. Even as some survivors continue to kiss their Cardinal’s rings, others harbor fantasies of murder and revenge.

Resume Writing for Humanities Majors Mon. January 29th, 2018
9:00 am-10:30 am

career workshop image

This workshop is part of a series designed to offer Humanities majors the opportunity to improve their professional writing skills. This session will focus on resume writing. It will include a presentation and workshop time to review and/or work on documents. Whether you’re starting from scratch or have existing materials, this series aims to give you tools that will enhance the written documents needed for pursing your career. 

This event is co-sponsored by the Career Center and the Writing Resource Center.

Registration requested.

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